Working with people of other nationalities.

Smelnick

Creeping On You
V.I.P.
#1
By this I mean, if you live in Canada(like I do) and you work with people from places like the Phillipines, India, Vietnam(just to name a few). People who's first language, isn't the language that your area uses or that you understand.

At my work, I'm one of three home grown canadians out of 16 people who work there. 4 are vietnamese , 6 are phillipinese, and 3 are east indian. The 3 east indian ladies speak hardly a lick of english. THis makes it very hard to teach them about the job. They are always doing things wrong, you tell them and show them how to do it properly, but they just keep doing it the wrong way. It's very frusterating.

It's really cool though, the Phillipinese people only half know english, so it's always fun, they bring me a list of words they've heard, and I write out the definitions for them.

So what about you guys, do you have a similiar work condition? Lets hear about it, those lack of your main language co-workers.
 

Xeilo

Registered Member
V.I.P.
#2
As I am in the army working in Afghanistan at the moment I get to see a lot of different people from different countries, I get to work with Dutch, French and Afghan soldiers a lot. The Dutch and French speak English pretty well, but not all. And the Afghan guys cant speak it well, so we usually get a inturprator in to fix that.
 

Smelnick

Creeping On You
V.I.P.
#3
As I am in the army working in Afghanistan at the moment I get to see a lot of different people from different countries, I get to work with Dutch, French and Afghan soldiers a lot. The Dutch and French speak English pretty well, but not all. And the Afghan guys cant speak it well, so we usually get a inturprator in to fix that.
I find using hand signals works the best. Everyone understands that.
 

Xeilo

Registered Member
V.I.P.
#4
I find using hand signals works the best. Everyone understands that.
Yeah that seems to work with a lot of the locals around here which is good because it makes everything easier. They are used to coalition forces around and doing what they are doing, so they are used to the whole thing.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#5
I worked for a project with UNESCO for the refugees and that itself had to deal with people who have no grasp of the French language. The other volunteers were Arabic and English speaking people and during the meetings, sign language helped a lot. It also helps to have a clue about their language and try to explain keywords using those. In a way, you also try to understand them instead of just making them understand you. It's an interesting learning opportunity. Btw, they're called Filipinos (the ones from the Philippines).
 

Impact

Registered Member
V.I.P.
#6
I work with a Phillipino, a South African and an Indian. All of their english is pretty good. The only reason I find them hard to understand is because of their accents.
 

Cait

Oh, poppycock.
#7
I can relate to your situation. My old school was a boarding school for people across the nation and world. There was Chinese, Russian, British, Japanese, and everything under the sun. There was a lot of asians though. Problem was a lot of them were just moving to the us and only knew practical english. To me that means, they knew how to speak proper but didn't know the slang. I became friends with a Chinese guy, and he would come to me and ask me what things meant. I would have to break it down like you would for a first grader. It was always interesting to level with them.
 

Merc

Certified Shitlord
V.I.P.
#8
I love working with "out-of-towners" no matter how far out of town they are but I won't lie, it's really annoying when communications are hampered.
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#9
Theres a guy who works here as a field employee (meaning not in the office) who migrated to the US via Political Asylum from Guatemala. He's actually here legally and is one of the better employees we have in terms of actually working. His only hitch is he has a very very strong accent, he understands a good amount of English and will straight up ask you what you mean if you use a word he doesnt recognize. He is what I consider a great example of how Migration SHOULD work.
 

DinoFlintstone

"There can be only one!"
#10
I've worked with Polish people, often the ones that don't understand your language can tell what you are trying to say to them, but Latvians tend to bug me... not only do they not understand.... they are as thick as shite.
 
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