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Discuss Working on your own car

MainerMikeBrown

Registered Member
Their is no way I'd ever try to work on my own vehicle. I wouldn't know what I was doing. And my mechanic is an honest guy. So I let him make repairs to my car.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
I wouldn't call it a "skill", haha. It's mostly the fact that I'm simply unwilling to pay someone hundreds if not thousands of dollars to work on my car when I could suffer through it myself.

Of course, when you drive older cars, the maintenance and repairs can start to really consume a lot of your time.
I drive nothing but older cars. 2003 Pathfinder 4x4. Paid cash. State limit insurance. I love it.
I'm on really good terms with my mechanic. He is convinced I can do some of my own repairs and has refused to work on my car telling me that I need to learn how. The last thing was the cooling fan which he assured me was a 15 min. job. I felt like such an idiot because it took hours to complete. lol.
 
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dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I drive nothing but older cars. 2003 Pathfinder 4x4. Paid cash. State limit insurance. I love it.
I'm on really good terms with my mechanic. He is convinced I can do some of my own repairs and has refused to work on my car telling me that I need to learn how. The last thing was the cooling fan which he assured me was a 15 min. job. I felt like such an idiot because it took hours to complete. lol.
It's amazing to not have a car payment. Gotta drive what you can afford and learn just a bit to keep it running.

Fans can be really hard because you have to disconnect the electrical connections which are commonly VERY stuck on older cars and you have to get it apart without breaking it since you still need the cable.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
I call my car buying the 10-10-100 rule. Less than 10 years old, 10% original sticker price, less than 100k miles.
And I only buy the top of the line model.


Between 7-10 years is the sweet spot. Lots of life left in the car After 7 years most banks won't finance so the sellers are very limited to who they can sell to. Still most people don't want to sell a car for $3500 that they paid 35000 for so getting 10% takes a lot of time and doesn't always work.

Less than 100k is a must. Most card won't make it past 200.

Buying top of the line is crucial. First people who but the best generally take care of it with oil changes and scheduled maintenance. Secondly having the luxury features makes it feel like a new car. Thirdly the manufacturer will often put better engines in the top of the line cars.

I've followed those rules my whole life and I've always done well with used cars. Except my pathfinder was over 10 and over 100 but it was big and bad and I wanted it so I bent the rules.
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
I drove a Ford Expedition until it hit about 240,000 miles. I change the oil, transmission fluid, and flush the radiator regularly. I had it for about 11 years when I finally got rid of her. She was an extremely reliable truck. After the warranty ran I did a little bit of the maintenance on it myself.
 
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