Words: Do They Have Meaning?

Merc

Certified Shitlord
V.I.P.
#1
No. Words have no definite meanings.

Why do ask?

It's simple. Words have different meanings depending on who you're talking to and what they interpret those words to mean. Words are mere representations of the things they claim to be. The word "chalk" for example is meaningless, it is simply a placeholder for an object. The word chalk itself doesn't mean anything. Write the word on a blackboard. Is it actually chalk? No, because as a book I'm reading in one of my classes states, "The word is not the thing."

I bring this up because I've always seen people quote the dictionary (I have myself) to prove a point or to try and solidify their opinions by bringing in what they believe to be the official meaning of a word or phrase. The problem with this is that words have no meaning, so how can you use a dictionary as more than a book of opinions?

This is a problem today because a lot people seem to assume that everyone's words mean the same things. It's probably why certain members on this site can't see anything but racism in others' words.

Thoughts?
 
#3
Indeed .. how many words are there for chalk ? think about it .. its only you associating that white stuff with the sounds of the word chalk that makes them linked .. a link that is in your dead .. about as physical as a pixel on your screen ..

One must remember that the meat doest come from the butcher as it were .. the butcher deals in meat .. as the dictionary deals in definitions for words .. or Egyptology deals in potential meanings for Egyptian traditions & developments ..

We store information gained in sources .. but that is not to say they are the source of information @ all .. only a resource of previously acquired information .. this is the difference between knowledge, wisdom & intelligence ..
  • knowledge - data backup
  • wisdom - algorithms that produce reasonably good results - a source of guessing techniques
  • Intelligence - capacity to manage information ..
 
#4
Indeed .. how many words are there for chalk ? think about it .. its only you associating that white stuff with the sounds of the word chalk that makes them linked .. a link that is in your dead .. about as physical as a pixel on your screen ..

One must remember that the meat doest come from the butcher as it were .. the butcher deals in meat .. as the dictionary deals in definitions for words .. or Egyptology deals in potential meanings for Egyptian traditions & developments ..

We store information gained in sources .. but that is not to say they are the source of information @ all .. only a resource of previously acquired information .. this is the difference between knowledge, wisdom & intelligence ..
  • knowledge - data backup
  • wisdom - algorithms that produce reasonably good results - a source of guessing techniques
  • Intelligence - capacity to manage information ..
Perhaps powdery stick of blackboard writing or childish sidewalk graffiti utensil(granted its not 1 word put, but multiple)?

Also, Intelligence isn't the capacity to manage information....its the appliance of knowledge....
 

Icyblackflame

Registered Member
#5
I have to DP, so don't kill me. HOwever, I have a question. The FC counter says that I entered 41thousand something characters, while MW said that I entered 12000 something (with spaces) and 10000something (without).

I was able to post this on livejournal, which means that it is not over 25,000 characters (mt post has a little over 2000 words). In another thread, it was almost 30,000 characters off. Can someone please explain this to me? FC seems to be the only website that tells me that my posts are over 25,000 characters long (oftentimes in the 40 and 50 thousands. MW usually says around 12thousand on average....) [Yes, I type a lot sometimes]
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This is a very pointless topic, and I dislike when it comes up. You know what, yes, words have meaning. If they did not, then how come you understand what I am saying?

Guess what. Words that have multiple meanings, how can they not count as meanings? The point is that they have meanings, and the fact that they change for certain contexts is irreverent. In fact, if they had no meaning, then how would you know that they change for context? You wouldn't recognize the meaning; therefore you wouldn't understand what is being said, no?

Take these:
"I am on the swimming team." Swimming - adj.
"I love swimming." Swimming - verb

Two different contexts. It's silly to think that the word "swim" has no meaning. The fact that words represent something indicate that they have meanings, does it not? Now, if one of those happened to be slang for, “I’m going to go smoke some pot,” then does it somehow cancel out the other meanings? No. We simply just added a new one.

It's silly to say "don't get mad at the words, get mad at the feelings behind them" when they are esentially the same thing. You can't have one without the other. If words don't have meanings, then try communicating for an extended stance of time without them.

And people need dictionaries. Sorry, but they really are the definitions, and the only people who don't accept them are those who are too pigheaded to realize that their definition is not what it really is. If I say that a table if blue, and you say that it is red, you saying that it is red does not make it red. You may argue that "blue" and "red" are just representations of the actual colors, but DUH! That's the point. If I said, "this table is munchablafugalooga," then would you understand what that meant? No. Would this word give you any reason to think that I am suggesting its color? No. Ya know why? Because this word actually has no meaning.

Same thing with "bad words." They are only representations of how someone feels, but when people say "you hurt my feelings," they are usually referring to the meanings behind the words. Since the words are essentially representing the feelings, they are one in the same, no?

If I said to you (over the internet) that I am going to kill you, then would you (personally) be worried? No. Why? Because my words (as in their meanings) pose no real threat. However, what if your mother said this, and she was serious? Would her words not frighten you? Would they not affect you? And if so, then how are they doing this without meaning?

I'm really sorry, but I'm going to do something dreadful and quote the really bad embarrassingly incorrect wiki and dictionary...just for the pure hell of it, 'cause we all know that it is wrong and thinks it knows everything and all that jazz *stabs a kitty*
word/wɜrd/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[wurd] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1.
a unit of language, consisting of one or more spoken sounds or their written representation, that functions as a principal carrier of meaning. Words are composed of one or more morphemes and are either the smallest units susceptible of independent use or consist of two or three such units combined under certain linking conditions, as with the loss of primary accent that distinguishes blackʹbirdʹ from blackʹ birdʹ. Words are usually separated by spaces in writing, and are distinguished phonologically, as by accent, in many languages.


2.
words,
a.
speech or talk: to express one's emotion in words; Words mean little when action is called for.

b.
the text or lyrics of a song as distinguished from the music.

c.
contentious or angry speech; a quarrel: We had words and she walked out on me.



3.
a short talk or conversation: Marston, I'd like a word with you.


4.
an expression or utterance: a word of warning.


5.
warrant, assurance, or promise: I give you my word I'll be there.


6.
news; tidings; information: We received word of his death.


7.
a verbal signal, as a password, watchword, or countersign.


8.
an authoritative utterance, or command: His word was law.


9.
Also called machine word. Computers. a string of bits, characters, or bytes treated as a single entity by a computer, particularly for numeric purposes.


10.
(initial capital letter) Also called the Word, the Word of God.
a.
the Scriptures; the Bible.

b.
the Logos.

c.
the message of the gospel of Christ.



11.
a proverb or motto.

–verb (used with object)
12.
to express in words; select words to express; phrase: to word a contract with great care.

—Idioms
13.
at a word, in immediate response to an order or request; in an instant: At a word they came to take the situation in hand.


14.
be as good as one's word, to hold to one's promises.


15.
eat one's words, to retract one's statement, esp. with humility: They predicted his failure, but he made them eat their words.


16.
have a word, to talk briefly: Tell your aunt that I would like to have a word with her.


17.
have no words for, to be unable to describe: She had no words for the sights she had witnessed.


18.
in a word, in summary; in short: In a word, there was no comparison. Also, in one word.


19.
in so many words, in unequivocal terms; explicitly: She told them in so many words to get out.


20.
keep one's word, to fulfill one's promise: I said I'd meet the deadline, and I kept my word.


21.
man of his word or woman of her word, a person who can be trusted to keep a promise; a reliable person.


22.
my word! or upon my word! (used as an exclamation of surprise or astonishment.)


23.
of few words, laconic; taciturn: a woman of few words but of profound thoughts.


24.
of many words, talkative; loquacious; wordy: a person of many words but of little wit.


25.
put in a good word for, to speak favorably of; commend: He put in a good word for her with the boss. Also, put in a word for.


26.
take one at one's word, to take a statement to be literal and true.


27.
take the words out of one's mouth, to say exactly what another person was about to say.


28.
weigh one's words, to choose one's words carefully in speaking or writing: It was an important message, and he was weighing his words.


[Origin: bef. 900; ME, OE; c. D woord, G Wort, ON orth, Goth waurd; akin to OPruss wirds, L verbum word, Lith var̃das name ]

 

Icyblackflame

Registered Member
#6
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Continued...
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Difficulty in defining the term
Depending on the language, words can sometimes be difficult to identify or delimit. While word separators, most often spaces, are commonplace in the written corpus of several languages, some languages such as Chinese and Japanese do not use these. Furthermore, synthetic languages often combine many different pieces of lexical data into single words, making it difficult to boil them down to the traditional sense of words found more easily in analytic languages; this is especially problematic for polysynthetic languages such as Inuktitut and Ubykh where entire sentences may consist of single such words. Especially confusing are languages such as Vietnamese, where spaces do not necessarily indicate breaks in words and boundaries must be determined by the context of the piece.
However, of all situations, the most confusing is those for oral languages, which potentially only offer phonolexical clues as to where word boundaries lie. Sign languages pose a similar problem as well, as does body language.
Official words, however, would be documented in a dictionary of whichever language you are categorizing it under.
What? Official words? …The fuck are those?

You may even get a kick out of these definitions:
def·i·ni·tion/ˌdɛfəˈnɪʃən/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[def-uh-nish-uhn] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1.
the act of defining or making definite, distinct, or clear.


2.
the formal statement of the meaning or significance of a word, phrase, etc.


3.
the condition of being definite, distinct, or clearly outlined.


4.
Optics. sharpness of the image formed by an optical system.


5.
Radio and Television. the accuracy of sound or picture reproduction.


[Origin: 1350–1400; ME diffinicioun < OF diffinition < L défīnītiōn- (s. of défīnītiō), equiv. to défīnīt(us) (see definite) + -iōn- -ion]
dic·tion·ar·y/ˈdɪkʃəˌnɛri/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[dik-shuh-ner-ee] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun, plural -ar·ies.
1.
a book containing a selection of the words of a language, usually arranged alphabetically, giving information about their meanings, pronunciations, etymologies, inflected forms, etc., expressed in either the same or another language; lexicon; glossary: a dictionary of English; a Japanese-English dictionary.


2.
a book giving information on particular subjects or on a particular class of words, names, or facts, usually arranged alphabetically: a biographical dictionary; a dictionary of mathematics.


3.
Computers.
a.
a list of codes, terms, keys, etc., and their meanings, used by a computer program or system.

b.
a list of words used by a word-processing program as the standard against which to check the spelling of text entered.



[Origin: 1520–30; < ML dictiōnārium, dictiōnārius < LL dictiōn- word (see diction) + -ārium, -ārius -ary]
Just in case this isn't good enough for you, I will further explain with an example:

"Tu tia Telila es una borde"

Does this make sense to you? If it does, then pretend that it is in another language. Do you know why this makes no sense to you? Because these words have no meaning.

Now, if I were to translate this into English, "Your aunt Telila is a nerd," then you understand that, do you not? Do you know why you understand it? Because you can now associate words with their meanings.

Check this:
lan·guage/ˈlæŋgwɪdʒ/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[lang-gwij] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1.
a body of words and the systems for their use common to a people who are of the same community or nation, the same geographical area, or the same cultural tradition: the two languages of Belgium; a Bantu language; the French language; the Yiddish language.


2.
communication by voice in the distinctively human manner, using arbitrary sounds in conventional ways with conventional meanings; speech.


3.
the system of linguistic signs or symbols considered in the abstract (opposed to speech).


4.
any set or system of such symbols as used in a more or less uniform fashion by a number of people, who are thus enabled to communicate intelligibly with one another.


5.
any system of formalized symbols, signs, sounds, gestures, or the like used or conceived as a means of communicating thought, emotion, etc.: the language of mathematics; sign language.


6.
the means of communication used by animals: the language of birds.


7.
communication of meaning in any way; medium that is expressive, significant, etc.: the language of flowers; the language of art.


8.
linguistics; the study of language.


9.
the speech or phraseology peculiar to a class, profession, etc.; lexis; jargon.


10.
a particular manner of verbal expression: flowery language.


11.
choice of words or style of writing; diction: the language of poetry.


12.
Computers. a set of characters and symbols and syntactic rules for their combination and use, by means of which a computer can be given directions: The language of many commercial application programs is COBOL.


13.
a nation or people considered in terms of their speech.


14.
Archaic. faculty or power of speech.


[Origin: 1250–1300; ME < AF, var. sp. of langage, deriv. of langue tongue. See lingua, -age]
Read here for more.

The only reason why we do not understand certain languages is because the meanings do not correspond with everyone's current knowledge.

I hope that I taught you something, but then again, my response is filled with words, and words have no meanings, so, therefore, you couldn’t possibly have learned anything because you are having such an amazing amount of trouble trying to figure out what each and every word means, correct? And then we have to take into consideration the fact that none of these words have meanings…

This could take a while.
-Icy

I do see your point. Please do not confuse the people who are using vocabulary that they do not know to sound smarter. They don't count because they are using the words incorrectly (you know when someone is saying something, and then they use a description word that means...something way off, which leaves you confused.) If I said, "that raindrop is a Native American," then would you understand what I meant? Your incorrect usage does not re-define a word. It just shows how much of an idiot you are. Please also do not confuse definite definitions with colloquial speech. Not that colloquial speech doesn't use real words. Do you know why some words can be used differently depending on context? Because we just gave them a new meaning.

EDIT: These definitions may also do you some good:
American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source sym·bol
(sĭm'bəl) Pronunciation Key


n.
  1. Something that represents something else by association, resemblance, or convention, especially a material object used to represent something invisible. See Synonyms at sign.
  2. A printed or written sign used to represent an operation, element, quantity, quality, or relation, as in mathematics or music.
  3. Psychology An object or image that an individual unconsciously uses to represent repressed thoughts, feelings, or impulses: a phallic symbol.
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
lin·guis·tics
/lɪŋˈgwɪs
tɪks/
Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[ling-gwis-tiks] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation –noun (used with a singular verb
) the science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics.
[Origin: 1850–55; see linguistic, -ics
]
You may want to talk to some linguists before you make threads like this.


 
#7
intelligence appliance of knowledge vs capacity to manage information

here we go .. what do you think is the difference between these two definitions

& please don't say something retarded like one is wrong one is right, or copy paste a def from the dic .. actually think about how one represents intelligence better than the other ..

What does intelligence mean .. what do you think it means .. before you check to see if its the same thing it says in the dic .. play ball
 
#8
Here ya go...think about this one....


In school I would sleep thru all my classes. The lectures I never got because I wasn't awake. I practically aced all my math tests and English tests (that didn't pertain to reading content [unless i read it outside of class]) without doing hardly any (practically none) homework (which is supposed to be practice). Was I managing gathered information from lectures or applying what I already knew?

Capacity means (of the top of my head [since you asked me not to go to a dictionary]) the retaining or receiving information.
Aplliance means (of the top of my head [since you asked me not to go to a dictionary]) putting something into use.
 

Icyblackflame

Registered Member
#9
intelligence appliance of knowledge vs capacity to manage information

here we go .. what do you think is the difference between these two definitions

& please don't say something retarded like one is wrong one is right, or copy paste a def from the dic .. actually think about how one represents intelligence better than the other ..

What does intelligence mean .. what do you think it means .. before you check to see if its the same thing it says in the dic .. play ball
Intelligence or false intelligence? Intelligence or ignorance? Intelligence of blatant stupidity? Intelligence of a superiority complex?

Sorry, I have to know which intelligence you mean. Ya know, because so many people don't know what intelligence is because they are too busy forming their own incorrect definitions and hopping around like it's correct.
-Icy

And, sorry, but I go by the dictionary, not my own definitions. I know how amazingly stupid people sound when they use certain words whereever the hell they want to, and I don't like sounding stupid like that.

EDIT: Question. HOw could you form your own definition of a work, or at least "put itin your own words" without knowing the dictionary definition first? "Putting it into your own words" implies taking someone else's wrods 0the definition- a restating the definition.

If I asked you what acquiescent meant, then how would you be able to define it at all without the definition?
 
#10
Your capacity to manage information allowed you to answer the questions, without having to have somebody else's spin to refer to .. rather than just repeating what you were told .. you made educated guesses based on your .. capacity to manage information ..

Had you only applied knowledge .. you would have done your homework & payed attention in class .. because you would be gathering knowledge to apply on tests .. but you didn't you applied your capacity to manage information instead .. using your experience with information, rather than the knowledge given by the classes & homework .