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Why I'm raising my son to be a nerd

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Why I'm raising my son to be a nerd - CNN.com

Pretty interesting article. I've been saying for years that if and when I have kids I'll start making them play sports at an early age. I won't force them, and if they don't like it then I won't be mad that they quit.
 

Vidic15

No Custom Title Exists
V.I.P.
Good on him and I think that's the perfect way to raise a child. In a way, my father has raised me like this and I definitely shall raise my children like that.
 

shelgarr

Registered Member
Yep, when our kids are young we introduce them to all sorts of things to see what they like. Soccer was our first try, and was a disaster. My son went on to play football, little league, and one short season of basketball. My daughter never tried another team sport, but is a distance runner and excels in cross country and track. Both are great students, my daughter a great artist, my son an avid gamer, both fun respectful people.

Their accomplishments however are just a fraction of their life....even education. It's so cutthroat here is our school district, I get tired of hearing about grades, courses, clubs, and colleges. I've let the kids decide to forfeit an A for a B instead if there's an inordinate time required for material that is just not worthy. It doesn't define who they are. That is where this guy kind of strays from the point.

His kid shows awesome potential and as a dad he has turned his enthusiasm toward is academic goals. (yay). Then, this article turned into a soapbox about education. I would of liked him to continue on with how the main key to parenting is learn what kind of person your kid is. Nurture his/her aptitudes, accept those things that are quirky, build up traits that make them unique, realize bad habits, and mostly love them and show them warmth. That is what is most important.
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
The best thign I pulled from this article was piece of mind... and a hilarious Venn Diagram




Im truly moved that Brain cells were worked in creating this clarification.
 

CaptainObvious

Embrace the Suck
V.I.P.
My dad played junior college basketball and I played sports since I was little. But both of my parents stressed education more than anything else. My dad used to tell me before every single sports season started "If you bring home anything less than a B, I'm pulling your ass out so you'll have more time to study". As much as we lived paycheck to paycheck and we were usually wanting for something, the one thing my parents never ever denied me was books, or a ride to the library. More parents should raise their kids to be nerds.
 

Swiftstrike

Registered Member
My dad played junior college basketball and I played sports since I was little. But both of my parents stressed education more than anything else. My dad used to tell me before every single sports season started "If you bring home anything less than a B, I'm pulling your ass out so you'll have more time to study". As much as we lived paycheck to paycheck and we were usually wanting for something, the one thing my parents never ever denied me was books, or a ride to the library. More parents should raise their kids to be nerds.
Ditto, parents stressed education above everything for myself and my sister.

But they are both school teachers and have Ph.D.s...so I can't imagine them emphasizing sports over books.
 

Shwa

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
It really should be on what the parents thinks is best for the child's life, education is going to be first but there is plenty of time for recreational sports and activities to occupy the child's time. It's also a great way to get out and meet new people, try new activities and learn great social niches when introduced to something outside of the learning environment.

Eventually when I have kids, I want them to be diligent with school work, but I'd give them free range to choose what they would like to do outside of school as long as its safe and peeks their interest.

~Shwa
 

Millz

Better Call Saul
Staff member
V.I.P.
I grew up with sports but my parents were tough on me educationally as well. I used sports as a way to unwind, relax and have fun but educuation was always a number one priority because they made sure it was.

I turned out to be a dork who likes sports and has a degree and it's working out okay for me.
 

Dekzper

Registered Member
I've been raised to be a nerd, lol, but it wasn't really necessary. I love soccer and baseball but I study everything I see and hear. And it's not really about making a good future. There's just a lot of things I'm interested in and wanna know everything about.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
I think I missed out a lot on extra curricular activities when I was young because my parents, er single mom, had no time to be involved with it. When there's an application for a training or something, she'd say we don't have money for it or to buy equipment and stuff. I kinda envied my schoolmates who could apply in the programs and their parents are there watching them perform and all that. However, my mom took time to tutor me after school. She's always making sure my assignments were done and I'm reviewed before exams. In the end, that wasn't so bad after all. Not everyone had such parents who paid attention to their child's academic progress.

I'm following the same route with my kids, while also trying to be present for them in school. I also ask them if they're interested in activities or want to be enrolled somewhere. But I will never force them the way other parents force their kids to take classes and all that to make up for what they missed in their own childhood.
 
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