• Welcome to the PopMalt Forums! Whether you're new to forums or a veteran, welcome to our humble home on the web! We're a 20-year old forum community with thousands of discussions on entertainment, lifestyle, leisure, and more.

    Our rules are simple. Be nice and don't spam. Registration is free, so what are you waiting for? Join today!.

Where Would the US Stand if Soccer Was the Primary Sport?

BigBob

Registered Member
Const, I have no idea what you're trying to say. Soccer is factually the most commonly played sport in the US today among kids.
Do you have a source to back that up?

No one good enough to potentially be a world class player is going to give up once they get to high school or college or whatever because there's "no high potential for success." If you're good enough, you work your way up the ladder until you reach heights that no American sport has the potential to reach.[/quote]

Well my high school had twin brothers that were some very amazing athlete's that many believe would have went pro and once they got to college.... didn't play. You can use this argument for any sports. What if Iverson stayed playing football, Lebron playing football, Antonio Gates playing basketball.
 

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
Do you have a source to back that up?
I don't have the time to find a proper source, but this is reliable enough: Sports in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5th paragraph down). I'm sure you can find more if you look around.

You can use this argument for any sports.
This is precisely my point. Players work their way up the ladders in the other sports and there are all kinds of amazing players in the end. You can make a direct comparison to Latin American baseball players. There's no money or competition in the Dominican Republic but they play anyway, either for the love of the game, or for the potential abroad.
 

Bananas

Endangered Species
I dont think the US would dominate the world if they breathed, ate and slept football. They would most probably be in the top tier of football and be one of the teams to beat just like Brazil or Germany but no team however big can completly dominate.

This is no bad part on the US its just the nature of the game, when you look at the cup games in Europe you have the term "giant killer" because the minnows come out and it only takes one goal and a shit load of determination to win games. Look at Greece who came out and won Euro2004.

Americans dont give the MLS the credit it is due, it is a bigger and more prosperous league than many of the European leagues(except the big 3). The game is played by millions of school kids and just because it is dwarfed by other sports does not make it a non-entity. Its worth remembering at this point that all these other nations dont just play football. In Europe Rugby, Basketball & Icehockey are too very popular.

Somehwere in the jungles of Borneo there is probably some kid who would be world class if only a talent scout found him. Americans have plenty of opportunity tro be world class as it is, sure if more programs were in place the production line of talent would increase but lets not deny that the US does have football as a grassroots sport.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
I think there's a good chance we'd be one of the dominating teams, and maybe even the best. Our nation has put a large emphasis on sports for a lot longer than a lot of other countries have. On top of that, we've been wealthy enough to pay people millions of dollars to play.

I think that's the biggest factor - we would probably have a lot of the best just because we'd pay them more.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
Actually if a player is that talented he will get picked up by a European club and have the opportunity to earn a lot of money. Not all American soccer players play in the MLS.
Maybe, who says it's a guarantee. I'm also more than aware that not all US soccer players are in the MLS, you don't need to state the obvious.

Const, I have no idea what you're trying to say. Soccer is factually the most commonly played sport in the US today among kids. No one good enough to potentially be a world class player is going to give up once they get to high school or college or whatever because there's "no high potential for success." If you're good enough, you work your way up the ladder until you reach heights that no American sport has the potential to reach.
Yeah, in kids under 13. That's because everyone makes their damn kids play soccer, where do you think the term "soccer mom" comes from? And no, it has nothing to do with being good enough, it has to do with willpower. Plenty of college sports stars or high school sports stars moved away from sports because they simply didn't want to do them. I'm aware that soccer's popularity has risen, but it's still nowhere near the popularity of any of the other four major team sports (football, baseball, hockey, basketball). In this country, soccer is like a mandatory kindergarten after school activity. People in this country are very rarely born into it like they are in European or South and Central American countries.

I also laughed at your jab at the end there. Please, don't embarrass yourself.

:rolleyes:
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
The current US team is not that bad. Right now, there's just not much interest in it no matter how it's widely played. It's still second or third class sports (or not even a sport) in the eyes of the nation. I assume it can only get better if US had the soccer culture like in most countries dominating the sport. The culture explains the passion people have to play it well and watch it (which also motivates teams to do better). You don't need to be rich to have this culture. However being a rich country does help because it can afford to scout extensively, provide a good training environment, pay for the best coaches, etc.
 

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
Yeah, in kids under 13. That's because everyone makes their damn kids play soccer (in the US)
People in this country are very rarely born into it like they are in European or South and Central American countries.
I'm absolutely baffled how there's any difference whatsoever here.

Look, if a kid is good enough, they want to make a career out of it, and they're committed enough, I think it's fair to say that it's virutally guarunteed they will get noticed. Anyway, the OP question included the hypothetical scenerio of the US having an identical soccer culture as those European, South and Central American countries.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
I'm absolutely baffled how there's any difference whatsoever here.
You would be.

So let me explain then since you can't tell the difference from being born into it compared to being forced into it at school age. Two children are born to separate homes, one has decorated the baby's room with typical toddler styles like wallpaper with little horses, blocks and toys on it. There are stuffed animals and all kinds of little things lying around. Another is born into a house where everything is labeled "Manchester United". The rattles, the clothes, the wallpaper, the booties, the diapers, the crib, everything.

Are we starting to see the difference?

They grow up, 7 years to be exact. The first child is put into an after school sports program to play soccer in order to help him meet new kids and stay in shape (and of course to help mommy or daddy mingle with the other parents). Meanwhile, the second child got a soccer ball for his first birthday, so he's been playing for 2 years now. He already sports a favorite jersey and gets mad at other kids who tell him what shite his favorite player is.

This is all very exaggerated, but I'm absolutely baffled as to how you can't see any difference whatsoever. :rolleyes:

I can give you my own personal example. Here in eastern Massachusetts, being a Sox fan is usually something you're born into. Not these October/November fans who cheer for them when they're in the playoffs. My dad loved the Sox and so did his friends. As a young kid, I heard about them all the time, saw them on TV and heard my parents talking about them. It became a part of who I was. Soccer in these countries is usually a case of a person being born into a household where soccer is part of the way of life. Soccer does not have that hold at all here in the US. Yes, some people get good and play professionally and get noticed, but soccer is not as important here as it is in almost every other country. The ferocity of soccer fans throughout the world is only matched by the NASCAR fans here in the US (unfortunately). Both show a dedication and source of fanship that stems from an early age. I'm not saying you can't become a fan, but almost all people that develop such love affairs with their favorite teams (no matter what sport) are usually born into it.

Is that better now?

Look, if a kid is good enough, they want to make a career out of it, and they're committed enough, I think it's fair to say that it's virutally guarunteed they will get noticed. Anyway, the OP question included the hypothetical scenerio of the US having an identical soccer culture as those European, South and Central American countries.
I'm glad you've finally agreed with me that we do not have the same culture. Took you long enough! You've pointed out three things:

Talent - A big "if" seeing as the US is basically in the "special olympics" category of soccer. We're getting better and I'm not saying we can't turn out world class players, but seeing as soccer has a very minimal focus here in the states and the fact that there are so many amazing players out there already means that the US has a small margin of entry into the world of soccer at the moment.

Committment - Committment is something I doubt the most only because our country does not pay much attention to soccer at the moment. If a kid is being forced to pick between several choices in school or sports, playing soccer may be fun but when it comes time to make that decision, there won't be that same push to keep playing as there is in other countries. Once again, not saying this always happens, but I bet it happens a helluva lot more in the US than anywhere else. Face it, as people in today's "civilized" societies, we strive to make names for ourselves. Most young people will not see soccer as a way to being a big shot or making a living mainly because it's just not seen that way here.

Motivation -
See above.

Exposure -
This relates once again to the whole committment and motivation deals, that the US simply doesn't have enough focus to guarantee media exposure. Not to mention, do you know many soccer scouts who are going to say, "I bet the US has a lot of talent!" No. They'll most likely stick to their own backyards.
So you've assumed that if someone can manage all of these at once, they'll be successful and that seems logically correct to me. However, I just don't find it likely because of the lack of interest and emphasis on soccer in the US, at the moment.
 

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
You're talking about reality though. This thread doens't have anything to do with reality; it has to do with the hypothetical scenerio that soccer is the primary sport in the US. Then we could assume that Americans would be born into it like the rest of the world, hence the similarities in the two quotes. You can't possibly be any more condescending, but you've completely forgotten what this thread is all about, chief.

Not that it's relevant at all, but you're far underrating the US national squad. We're consistently ranked in the top 25 and we've qualified for the last five World Cups, including advancing to the quarterfinals in 2002.
 

oxyMORON

A Darker Knight
I think the US has a lot of potential, but something tells me the work ethic here is different than that of Europe. I'm thinking it's a bit more lax than the Europeans. If anything's going to prevent us from being dominant in the world's largest sport, it's going to be the amount of work we put in.

Talent matters a lot too, but I'm sure there's plenty of it.
 
Top