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Where Would the US Stand if Soccer Was the Primary Sport?

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
Let's pretend that American football, baseball, basketball, hockey and, hell, even Nascar were nonexistent. All 300 million of us grew up watching and playing soccer. Do you think we would dominate the world, rank at the top of the FIFA world rankings, succeed in the World Cups, etc.?

Personally, I think we would be a dominate force, but not necessarily because of our population. For instance, the Czech Rep., with only a population of 8 million or so, is usually ranked disproportionately high in the world rankings. You could say the same for Croatia too. Highly populated Brazil isn't even in the top three these days.

So what do you think? Oh and how about avoiding ad hominems about how much soccer sucks and how big of pussies the players are. Let's try to keep this intelligent and on target.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
I think the United States would consistently be one of the top five teams in the world. Imagine all of our best athletes playing soccer from childhood. The only thing that would hold us back is getting everyone to play together, which is what seems to hurt some of the other more talented countries like Argentina and Brazil. Also, I think it hurts having such little quality competition in the region compared to a region like Europe. Those countries play against the best on a regular basis.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
I think nationality doesn't matter.

If a country has played a sport long enough and has an extensive history of dedication to it, they're going to turn out good players. There's plenty of amazing US soccer players, but no one knows who they are because the US simply doesn't follow it.
 

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
Nationality has a lot to do with it. There are several European, African and South American countries with high populations and an immense history of dedication that make no impact on a global scale.

There aren't plenty of amazing US soccer players at all. The only players who are anywhere near amazing are Howard, Donovan, Dempsey, Beasley, Altidore, Adu... am I missing someone? It's not that no one knows who they are, it's that they don't exist.

And Echoes makes some good points but Brazil, Ivory Coast and Ghana are obvious exceptions to the obstacle of lack of regional competition.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
Nationality has a lot to do with it. There are several European, African and South American countries with high populations and an immense history of dedication that make no impact on a global scale.
I think a lot of it has to do with how much money a country has to put into the sport. Most of the wealthy nations with high populations have top level football teams. If the country doesn't have the money to pay good coaches and open up youth football camps and stuff, then they're not going to be able to compete at the elite level.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
So you honestly believe that some nationalities are simply better based on their birthplace? That's a bit . . shallow. Not to mention quite incorrect.

Also, I'd like to know how you've met every single American soccer player, that's quite a feat to be able to say that there are next to none of them. Plenty of amazing soccer players are here in the US, but when it comes time for a career, how many of them do you think honestly consider playing soccer? It's a pointless choice in this country because it's just not a big sport.
 

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
Echoes,
Even if a lot of poor countries (Brazil, Argentina, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Cameroon, etc.) don't have good domestic leagues, they churn out countless truly world class players.

And Constantine,
I do think birthplace matters. And personally meeting a player is not a prerequisite to the ability to understand if he is world class or not. I haven't met more than one professional American soccer player, but I've seen the US National Team play live twice, I watch every match on TV, and I liberally watch 4 of the top 5 European leagues. I understand the difference between world class and globally insignificant players, and I know where they come from.

And it's not a pointless choice at all to play in the US if you are good enough. I'd rather play in the mediocre MLS than work a 9-5. Then if you're good enough, you go to Europe where there is virtually unlimited potential, money, and competition.
 
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Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
You do realize that just because the US has a team, that it means they have the best players, right? Being good doesn't mean being noticed. Like I said already, not every great player comes forth in this country because it's just not high potential for success. They would probably have more chances of success with a 9-5 than playing soccer in the US. Saying that playing soccer in the US is a good idea is like saying, "Like baseball? France is for you!"
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
You do realize that just because the US has a team, that it means they have the best players, right? Being good doesn't mean being noticed. Like I said already, not every great player comes forth in this country because it's just not high potential for success. They would probably have more chances of success with a 9-5 than playing soccer in the US. Saying that playing soccer in the US is a good idea is like saying, "Like baseball? France is for you!"
Actually if a player is that talented he will get picked up by a European club and have the opportunity to earn a lot of money. Not all American soccer players play in the MLS.
 

RTWmaniac

Registered Member
Const, I have no idea what you're trying to say. Soccer is factually the most commonly played sport in the US today among kids. No one good enough to potentially be a world class player is going to give up once they get to high school or college or whatever because there's "no high potential for success." If you're good enough, you work your way up the ladder until you reach heights that no American sport has the potential to reach.
 
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