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When a job interview asks for salary requirements

IrishLass2247

Registered Member
I am going for a job and was asked by the president of the company what my salary requirements are. I truly despise this question. I'm always afraid to go too low or too high.

How do you determine what you are worth and have that translate into what you want to be paid? Has your answer ever disqualified you from a job, or caused you to be under-compensated? I'm curious about how to proceed.
 

Interis

Registered Member
I am going for a job and was asked by the president of the company what my salary requirements are. I truly despise this question. I'm always afraid to go too low or too high.

How do you determine what you are worth and have that translate into what you want to be paid? Has your answer ever disqualified you from a job, or caused you to be under-compensated? I'm curious about how to proceed.
I agree that it is an uncomfortable question. I suppose it means they want to see how I appreciate my own abilities (and whether they should do the same). When it happens, I try to give an answer as diplomatic as possible. We all know money is important, but we can't be too straightforward about it, no? Maybe saying things like "I pay more attention to the specifics of the job if it's in line with my skills and interests, I believe the salary you have in mind is competitive enough" or give an estimation range referring to past experiences and research.
 

Impaired

Registered Member
Find out the average pay for the job in your area for you amount of expertise.

Then rate yourself on where you think you rate on the scale above or below average. Ask for pay commensurate with your experience and skill level. if you think you deserve more, ask for more. All they can say is no or make a counter offer. If they don't think you are worth what you think you deserve, do you want to work there?

That said, I have taken jobs for less pay than I wanted because I liked the environment, the people or the experience I would earn. These things can be more valuable than money.
 

IrishLass2247

Registered Member
So, I actually did a blend of both your answers. I researched what similar positions pay and came up with a dollar amount that was pretty much average for the position. I didn't want to go with the high end because this job will require a learning curve as it is slightly different from any position I have ever had. I didn't go to low because I know what I am bringing to the table. I also made it clear that I am less concerned about the salary, and more interested in the opportunity to work with this company. The President was on vacation this past week, so I will hopefully hear something this week. It would be amazing if it works out and I get it.
Thank you both for your suggestions!
 

Impaired

Registered Member
Best of luck! I hope it works out for you.
 

IrishLass2247

Registered Member
Best of luck! I hope it works out for you.
Thank you! To say this is my dream job is an understatement so I am certainly hoping for the best! I am putting myself out there in a big way, so if I do not get it, at least I know I tried.
 

Impaired

Registered Member
Thank you! To say this is my dream job is an understatement so I am certainly hoping for the best! I am putting myself out there in a big way, so if I do not get it, at least I know I tried.
I have my dream job 2 days a week but the other 3 are slaving in hell for people who don't appreciate me and piss me off on a daily basis. The two days makes the other 3 tolerable.
 

Bubbles

I ♥ Haters
I am going for a job and was asked by the president of the company what my salary requirements are. I truly despise this question. I'm always afraid to go too low or too high.

How do you determine what you are worth and have that translate into what you want to be paid? Has your answer ever disqualified you from a job, or caused you to be under-compensated? I'm curious about how to proceed.
I'm late to the party here but not wanting to answer this question is how people get pigeon holed into low paying jobs. My rule of thumb is go a few dollars over what you really want. For example at my current job, wages were negotiable but the starting offer was $16.31 for my current position, which is a joke if you take the actual work into consideration along with my skills and education level. I was able to negotiate to the point of getting 5 bucks more than what they offered me. Companies get away with low balling candidates because hiring managers are aware that a large part of the population feels uncomfortable with wage negotiations. Most people just want to go in and land the job and not come across as greedy. But it's not greedy at all. If anything it shows that you're confident in ability to do the job and you know what you're worth.

I've haggled at every interview I've ever been to and I've never be disqualified for my wage expectations.
 
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