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What does it mean?

AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
Have you heard that old saying and not really gotten the idea of what it means?

For example:

I don't get "having your cake and eating it too."
-If I had cake, why wouldn't I want to eat it? What am I supposed to do, just look at it?

"Same difference"
-If it's different how is it the same? Someone once explained it to me but my brain would not absorb it. Probably because I thought the guy explaining it to me was a complete idiot.



Do you have any?
 

Millz

Better Call Saul
Staff member
V.I.P.
"It is what it is."

I hate that saying so much haha. And to be honest, I am guilty of using it on occasion and whenever I do, a kitten dies.

Its just a really dumb saying.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
"I could care less."

So you're saying that you could actually care less? Then why does it not appear that way? I think you meant to say "I couldn't care less." :lol: The logic is just entirely flawed and it really gets on my nerves that nobody even seems to care that it's said wrong all the time. Even if people did say it the right way I don't care for it much because I hate it when people have an attitude of apathy about most things (religion and politics fall under this category)
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
For example:
I don't get "having your cake and eating it too."
-If I had cake, why wouldn't I want to eat it? What am I supposed to do, just look at it?
I still insist that this is easy to understand. It's about having both at once. The ability to look at your slice of cake after having eaten it.
------
This is why the original "eating your cake and having it too" makes somewhat more sense.
 
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AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
"It is what it is."

I hate that saying so much haha. And to be honest, I am guilty of using it on occasion and whenever I do, a kitten dies.

Its just a really dumb saying.
That's a good one. I really hate that one too.

I still insist that this is easy to understand. It's about having both at once. The ability to look at your slice of cake after having eaten it.
------
This is why the original "eating your cake and having it too" makes somewhat more sense.
It still doesn't make sense to me. Why would I want to just look at cake? I do not find it pleasing just to look at it. Is it supposed to be artistically decorated cake?
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
Here's a version that should make sense. You have a car. For whatever reason, you need to sell your car, but you want to keep the car afterwards. The two are mutually exclusive. It is impossible to relinquish ownership of your car and maintain it at the same time. To do so would be trying to sell your car and keeping it too.
 

AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
That makes more sense. They should have said car instead of cake. lol
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
Same difference - I think this is one of those ones where the phrasing is a little misleading. Basically, it means that there are 2 (or more) options that are different, but that are close enough to being the same for what is needed.


(I assume the others people understand, but just hate them?)
 

AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
Same difference - I think this is one of those ones where the phrasing is a little misleading. Basically, it means that there are 2 (or more) options that are different, but that are close enough to being the same for what is needed.


(I assume the others people understand, but just hate them?)
But if it's the SAME difference, how can the differences be any different? How can it be the same if it's not. I swear I'm not being obtuse. For some reason my brain will not understand.

It was explained to me in terms of fruit, but I'm not sure how accurate that is. He kept telling me that the difference between an apple and an orange were the same...which didn't really make sense to me at all.
 

Smelnick

Creeping On You
V.I.P.
I usually use 'same difference' when choosing between two objects. If it doesn't matter which I choose, I say 'same difference' because the difference between the possible outcomes is the same no matter which is chosen.
 
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