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What are the worst MVP selections ever?

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Off the top of my head...

Pendleton over Bonds
I-Rod over Pedro
Dawson over Clark

What are your thoughts and reasons behind your answers.
 

StroShow

The return shall be legenday!
V.I.P.
The 1942 MVP. Ted Williams won the triple crown and led the league in virtually every offensive category including OPB, SLG, OPS, TB, BB and Runs. The only categories where Gordon led the league that year was in SO's and GDP's. I'm not suggesting that Gordon had a terrible year. He did hit .322 with 18 HR's, 103 RBI's and had an OBP of .409 but Williams was significantly better.
 

DarrylMHB

New Member
Apologies to my fellow Canadians, but Morneau over Jeter/Ortiz/Mauer etc. in 2006 was ridiculous.
 
Morneau was a bad choice, but not atrocious in my opinion. Here are my top 5:

5. Willie Hernandez over Eddie Murray (1984). The AL didn't feature many great candidates this year. Still, Hernandez did not contribute enough to garner MVP over someone playing every day like Murray (see #1).
4. Jim Konstanty over Stan Musial (1950). Konstanty definitely played a critical part in leading the Whiz Kids and defining a relief pitcher's role, but just look at Musial's numbers. He was a hit machine who sprayed all types of hits across the entire field. How much worse would the Cards have fared without his presence?
3. Joe Gordon over Ted Williams (1942). As someone mentioned, Gordon led the league in strikeouts and double plays. However, this reason this is only number three is because Gordon still put up very impressive offensive numbers, especially for a second baseman. In the field, he was an absolute master. Williams, on the other hand, made it no secret that he cared little for glove work.
2. Don Baylor over Fred Lynn (1979). Um…this choice was so awful it is an embarrassment to the award. Lynn led the league in the slash line (though only average was really looked at then) and had more home runs than Baylor. He was also a very good fielder who patrolled the deep expanses of Fenway. Baylor, on the other hand, only played half of his games in the field. Those games he did play in left were poor showmanship of a glove. Even as early as 1970, Cal Ripken Sr. recognized his weak arm. It doesn't take the modern analysis of WAR (Baylor's 3.7 to Lynn's 8.8) to realize how awful of a decision the voters made.
1. Dennis Eckersley over…anyone else (1992). What a year for MVP snubs. It's difficult to conceive how Eckersley took the Cy Young over Clemens, let alone fathom how he managed to swindle the MVP over the likes of Puckett, Frank Thomas, Edgar Martinez, or Roberto Alomar. I'm all for the value of pitchers, and fully support the position winning the MVP. For someone who pitches 80 or so innings to earn it, he'd have to allow about three runs and save plenty of one-run or absolutely crucial games.
 
willge87 said:
I've seen people crap on George Bell winning the AL MVP in 1987 over Alan Trammell, but I do not have the sabremetric knowledge to write a paragraph as to why.
I'm not going to pretend I'm a sabermetric savant, but I think I know enough to help.

Sabermetrically speaking, Trammell trumped Bell in WAR 8.2 to 5.0 (by BBRef calculations). Much of that is due to position. A lesser offensive position (i.e. shortstop) that compares favorably to a higher offensive position (i.e. left field) is more valuable. Trammell bested Bell in BA and OBP while putting up respectable slugging numbers. All the while, Trammell's home ballpark was mathematically less favorable to hitters than Bell's. So right from the start, you know that Trammell is in good if not better offensive company than Bell.

A shortstop receives an added 7.5 runs per 600 plate appearances whereas a left fielder loses 7.5 runs per 600 plate appearances. In the end, if we assume 10 runs= 1 team win, then these adjustments will ultimately lead to a higher/lower WAR when calculating the runs above replacement portion and converting that figure into wins above replacement.

Finally, WAR takes defense into account. Trammell's dWAR in 1987 was 0.9, while Bell's was -0.5. Here is where I cannot help you, because WAR is not simply offensive war (oWAR) plus dWAR. This part I'm still trying to figure out. The point is, somewhere along the line, Bell is hurt by a negative defensive value and Trammell benefits. Altogether, Trammell turns out to be a far more critical player than Bell.

Sabermetrically speaking.
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
How about Alex Rodriguez over Carlos Delgado in 2003 with what we know now about A-Rod?
 

willge87

Registered Member
Tyrus4189Cobb said:
willge87 said:
I've seen people crap on George Bell winning the AL MVP in 1987 over Alan Trammell, but I do not have the sabremetric knowledge to write a paragraph as to why.
I'm not going to pretend I'm a sabermetric savant, but I think I know enough to help.

Sabermetrically speaking, Trammell trumped Bell in WAR 8.2 to 5.0 (by BBRef calculations). Much of that is due to position. A lesser offensive position (i.e. shortstop) that compares favorably to a higher offensive position (i.e. left field) is more valuable. Trammell bested Bell in BA and OBP while putting up respectable slugging numbers. All the while, Trammell's home ballpark was mathematically less favorable to hitters than Bell's. So right from the start, you know that Trammell is in good if not better offensive company than Bell.

A shortstop receives an added 7.5 runs per 600 plate appearances whereas a left fielder loses 7.5 runs per 600 plate appearances. In the end, if we assume 10 runs= 1 team win, then these adjustments will ultimately lead to a higher/lower WAR when calculating the runs above replacement portion and converting that figure into wins above replacement.

Finally, WAR takes defense into account. Trammell's dWAR in 1987 was 0.9, while Bell's was -0.5. Here is where I cannot help you, because WAR is not simply offensive war (oWAR) plus dWAR. This part I'm still trying to figure out. The point is, somewhere along the line, Bell is hurt by a negative defensive value and Trammell benefits. Altogether, Trammell turns out to be a far more critical player than Bell.

Sabermetrically speaking.
Seems like a good explanation to me. Another simple fact is that the Tigers edged the Blue Jays out for the AL East pennant before inexplicably losing to the Twins.
 
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