Was The Last Elected People's President Richard M. Nixon?

Rapier

Registered Member
V.I.P.
#1
It certainly looks like his is the last administration/Congress to look out for John Q. Public.

I refuse to consider Carter because he pardoned all the traitors who returned from Canada.
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MenInTights

not a plastic bag
#2
Well, I'd have to dust off my Alex Jones books, but if you really wanted to get conspiratorial, I think Reagan was the last president that was not a member of the CFR or the Trilateral Commission.



(yeah, I really don't have any Alex Jones books...:shifteyes:....no, really I don't)
 

Gavik

Registered Member
#3
Well, I'd have to dust off my Alex Jones books, but if you really wanted to get conspiratorial, I think Reagan was the last president that was not a member of the CFR or the Trilateral Commission.



(yeah, I really don't have any Alex Jones books...:shifteyes:....no, really I don't)
We was an actor that was paid to front GE products for a good portion of his career. Seems like great qualification for a president. And whatever aspects of imperialism he didn't support got a lot of love from him after the assassination attempt.
 

Sim

Registered Member
#4
It certainly looks like his is the last administration/Congress to look out for John Q. Public.

I refuse to consider Carter because he pardoned all the traitors who returned from Canada.
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What do you mean by "people's President"?

What I noticed is that polarization seems to have grown. Both Bush jr and Obama were/are strongly supported by one side of the public, but passionately hated by the other.

Except maybe after Clinton's Lewinsky business, Clinton and Bush sr seemed to be less controversial. At least they were not that passionately hated by their opponents, and not as passionately supported by their supporters. They both seemed more centrist, and put more effort to please "the other side" too. But I may be wrong.
 
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Rapier

Registered Member
V.I.P.
#6
What do you mean by "people's President"?

What I noticed is that polarization seems to have grown. Both Bush jr and Obama were/are strongly supported by one side of the public, but passionately hated by the other.

Except maybe after Clinton's Lewinsky business, Clinton and Bush sr seemed to be less controversial. At least they were not that passionately hated by their opponents, and not as passionately supported by their supporters. They both seemed more centrist, and put more effort to please "the other side" too. But I may be wrong.

Noam Chomsky remarked that, in many respects, Nixon was "the last liberal president."[101] Indeed, Nixon believed in using government wisely to benefit all and supported the idea of practical liberalism.[102]

One of Nixon's economic advisers, Herbert Stein, wrote: "Probably more new regulation was imposed on the economy during the Nixon administration than in any other presidency since the New Deal."[89]
[edit] Initiatives within the federal government

2 likely reasons the corporate owned media made such a big deal over Watergate. No President has interceded, on behalf of the American citizen/worker, against deregulation since.


Richard Nixon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nixon wanted to lift the spirits of the country as polls showed increasing concern about the economy. His program was viewed by nearly everyone as exceptionally bold, and astounded the Democrats.[98] Nixon soon experienced a bounce in the polls.[99] His economic program was determined to be a clear success by December 1971.[100] One of Nixon's economic advisers, Herbert Stein, wrote: "Probably more new regulation was imposed on the economy during the Nixon administration than in any other presidency since the New Deal."[89]
[edit] Initiatives within the federal government

Noam Chomsky remarked that, in many respects, Nixon was "the last liberal president."[101] Indeed, Nixon believed in using government wisely to benefit all and supported the idea of practical liberalism.[102]

Nixon initiated the Environmental Decade by signing the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act amendments of 1972, as well as establishing many government agencies. These included the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA),[89] and the Council on Environmental Quality.[103] The Clean Air Act was noted as one of the most significant pieces of environmental legislation ever signed.[104]

In 1971, Nixon proposed the creation of four new government departments superseding the current structure: departments organized for the goal of efficient and effective public service as opposed to the thematic bases of Commerce, Labor, Transportation, Agriculture, et al. Departments including the State, Treasury, Defense, and Justice would remain under this proposal.[105] He reorganized the Post Office Department from a cabinet department to a government-owned corporation: the U.S. Postal Service.

On June 17, 1971, Nixon formally declared the U.S. War on Drugs.[106]

Nixon cut billions of dollars in federal spending and expanded the power of the Office of Management and Budget.[107] He established the Consumer Product Safety Commission in 1972[103] and supported the Legacy of parks program, which transferred ownership of federally owned land to the states, resulting in the establishment of state parks and beaches, recreational areas, and environmental education centers.
[edit] Civil rights

The Nixon years witnessed the first large-scale integration of public schools in the South.[108] Strategically, Nixon sought a middle way between the segregationist George C. Wallace and liberal Democrats, whose support of integration was alienating some Southern white Democrats.[109] He was determined to implement exactly what the courts had ordered— desegregation — but did not favor busing children, in the words of author Conrad Black, "all over the country to satisfy the capricious meddling of judges."[110] Nixon, a Quaker, felt that racism was the greatest moral failure of the United States[111] and concentrated on the principle that the law must be color-blind: "I am convinced that while legal segregation is totally wrong, forced integration of housing or education is just as wrong."[112]

Nixon tied desegregation to improving the quality of education[111] and enforced the law after the Supreme Court, in Alexander v. Holmes County Board of Education (1969), prohibited further delays. By the fall of 1970, two million southern black children had enrolled in newly created unitary fully integrated school districts; only 18% of Southern black children were still attending all-black schools, a decrease from 70% when Nixon came to office.[104] Nixon's Cabinet Committee on Education, under the leadership of Labor Secretary George P. Shultz, quietly set up local biracial committees to assure smooth compliance without violence or political grandstanding.[113] "In this sense, Nixon was the greatest school desegregator in American history," historian Dean Kotlowski concluded.[114] Author Conrad Black concurred: "In his singular, unsung way, Richard Nixon defanged and healed one of the potentially greatest controversies of the time."[115] Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Nixon's presidential counselor, commented in 1970 “There has been more change in the structure of American public school education in the last month than in the past 100 years.”[116]

In addition to desegregating public schools, Nixon implemented the Philadelphia Plan, the first significant federal affirmative action program in 1970.[117] Nixon also endorsed the Equal Rights Amendment after it passed both houses of Congress in 1972 and went to the states for ratification as a Constitutional amendment.[118] Nixon had campaigned as an ERA supporter in 1968, though feminists criticized him for doing little to help the ERA or their cause after his election, which led to a much stronger women's rights agenda. Nixon increased the number of female appointees to administration positions.[119] Nixon signed the landmark laws Title IX in 1972, prohibiting gender discrimination in all federally funded schools and the Equal Employment Opportunity Act. In 1970 Nixon had vetoed the Comprehensive Child Development Act, denouncing the universal child-care bill, but signed into law Title X, which was a step forward for family planning and contraceptives.

It was during the Nixon Presidency that the Supreme Court issued its Roe v. Wade ruling, legalizing abortion. First Lady Pat Nixon had been outspoken about her support for legalized abortion, a goal for many feminists (though there was a significant pro-life minority faction of the Women's Liberation Movement as well). Nixon himself did not speak out publicly on the abortion issue, but was personally pro-choice, and believed that, in certain cases such as rape, or an interracial child, abortion was an option.[120]
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Since when are draft dodgers traitors?
Since my friends and fellow servicemen died or came home damaged after fighting the spread of Communism for our country.
 
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Gavik

Registered Member
#7
Since my friends and fellow servicemen died or came home damaged after fighting the spread of Communism for our country.
You wanna talk about betraying the troops? Look no further than Nixon and Kissinger. Both conspired to sabotage the peace talks in 68 in order to win the presidential election. You wanna really talk about betrayal? How about the fact that the Gulf of Tonkin was staged in order to get the US overtly involved. Vietnamese Communism a threat to the US? What a joke.
 

Rapier

Registered Member
V.I.P.
#8
You wanna talk about betraying the troops? Look no further than Nixon and Kissinger. Both conspired to sabotage the peace talks in 68 in order to win the presidential election. You wanna really talk about betrayal? How about the fact that the Gulf of Tonkin was staged in order to get the US overtly involved. Vietnamese Communism a threat to the US? What a joke.
Communism was a threat to the world. Everything on the world stage is angled and reangled behind closed doors.

Carter's action was an upfront and personal lunger at the American people and their lost and damaged sons to satisfy the American media with closure.
 

Gavik

Registered Member
#9
Communism was a threat to the world.
Right, because America crumbled when Vietnam went communist.

Also, that implies that capitalism isn't. All just false paradigm used to scare and control the masses. The Soviet Union and US were two sides to the same coin.

Everything on the world stage is angled and reangled behind closed doors.
Yes, but how does that relate your threat of communism statement?

Carter's action was an upfront and personal lunger at the American people and their lost and damaged sons to satisfy the American media with closure.
They were already exiled to Canada away from their homes and families. Are you suggesting it's an insult because those drafted were too stupid to flee? I don't see how it devalues their service. They are too separate things.

In 1971, Colonel Robert Heini made the statement “By every conceivable indicator, our army that now remains in Vietnam, is in a state approaching collapse. With individual units avoiding or having refused combat, murdering their officers and non-commissioned officers, drug ridden, dispirited, where they are not mutinous”.

It is always justified to refuse to serve in an unjust war. Remind yourself of the GI revolts. This was bigger than just a few "traitors."
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#10
Are you suggesting it's an insult because those drafted were too stupid to flee?
I'm going to assume you're saying this as a theatrical retort. Because the statement itself is just as inane as calling the Protesters "Traitors".


It is always justified to refuse to serve in an unjust war. Remind yourself of the GI revolts. This was bigger than just a few "traitors."
But yet its never justified to refuse rights to those who refused to aide the nation that provides them.... :eyebrow:

where I'm from we call that freeloading.