Was an Innocent Man Executed?

Discussion in 'Politics & Law' started by ExpectantlyIronic, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. ExpectantlyIronic

    ExpectantlyIronic e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑

    -source

    I highly recommend reading the New Yorker article linked below. It's very engrossing, and since it's from The New Yorker, you can be sure it's reliable.

    TRIAL BY FIRE - The New Yorker

    There's plenty of reason to doubt that Willingham was guilty, and the evidence points to his being innocent, imho. Yet, he was still executed. How can we justify the death penalty, if there is even a chance that an innocent man be executed?
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2009

  2. Bananas

    Bananas Endangered Species

    For some the needs outweighs the risk. Personaly I cant see how you can take revenge and call it justice.
     
    BigBob likes this.
  3. CaptainObvious

    CaptainObvious Son of Liberty V.I.P.

    The death penalty isn't revenge. The death penalty is a sentence for certain crimes. Is putting someone in prison for life revenge? How does anyone think the death penalty has anything to do with revenge?
     
  4. Bananas

    Bananas Endangered Species

    Then why dont you tell me how executing someone is anything other than retribution?

    I suppose it also serves as a detterent to some extent but if you could enlighten me to what else it serves that does not consist of some kind of retribution otherwise I will continue to consider it as an act of revenge.

    So far all you've told me is it is a "sentence" which in no way exempts it from an act of revenge. Please continue.
     
  5. CaptainObvious

    CaptainObvious Son of Liberty V.I.P.

    Of course it does exempt it from revenge. It's a sentence for a criminal act. Just like probabtion is. Of course the sentence is much harsher than probabtion, but it's commenserate with the crime. You're free to consider it whatever you want and call it whatever you want. But calling it revenge is erroneous.
     
  6. Bananas

    Bananas Endangered Species

    Probation is at worse an act of repression, sentencing some to death is one extreme form of repression if you consider them the same. So on that point I still do not understand what purpose execution serves other than that of retribution. You are saying I am incorrect but you have still yet to give any kind of convincing argument to suggest otherwise.... what purpose does execution serve?


    For your benefit I will explain how it is revenge. Just like the Old testament; An Eye for an Eye.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2009
  7. PretzelCorps

    PretzelCorps Registered Member

    Calling it revenge may be a little erroneous, but the death penalty is not ideal as a tool of justice --> You can at least somewhat make amends for wrongfully imprisoning someone, but you cannot take back death.
     
  8. Mirage

    Mirage Administrator Staff Member V.I.P.

    The death penalty is no more revenge than any other sentencing. I don't get why so many people are so concerned about putting murderers to death. Somebody gets killed and instead of focusing on how terrible the crime was, it's as if people jump immediately to "let's make sure the murderer is still able to live out the rest of his life in peace."
     
  9. PretzelCorps

    PretzelCorps Registered Member

    As I said in my previous post, the issue with the death penalty is not putting murderers to death; have at 'em --> The issue with the death penalty is the overly high number of wrongful imprisonments there are. The pro-death penalty side relies on a self-fulfilling prophecy. You may never actually hear about wrongful executions, but that isn't because there are none; it's because nobody ever bothers to ever look into an old case if the person in question is already dead.
     
  10. Wade8813

    Wade8813 Registered Member

    'Revenge' is generally used when a person who was wronged retaliates. In a death penalty case, it's quite possible that the only person who was wronged is dead (if the murdered person has no living friends/family).

    That's not entirely true - while the biggest argument against the death penalty is the people who are wrongfully convicted, there are people who would be against it even if we had a perfect justice system (as evidenced by some of the arguments against it - that we're stooping to their level, etc).
     

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