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Vegetarians May Be Predisposed to Hating Meat

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
Deciding if you should practice vegetarianism may all come down to a smell test. Scientists at Duke University have discovered that those who skip meat may have genes that cause them to find the animal odor more overwhelming than others.
URL: Vegetarians May Be Predisposed to Hating Meat - Gene Found That Detects Sensitivity to Pork - Delish.com

So apparently a study has been done which suggests some vegetarians could put their meat-hating down to genetics. Pretty interesting, apparently some people are predisposed to hate the smell of meat, and the smell of pork can be almost intolerable to them.

While I find this study interesting I don't think it would be very accurate for most vegetarians. All the vegetarians I know besides two are vegetarian due to ethical/animal rights reasons. I only know two who are because they just don't like meat.

For me I think it could almost be half/half. I'm vegetarian for ethical and personal health reasons, yet at the same time when I am in a butcher shop I feel almost physically ill from the smell. I can't stay in there for too long. So maybe there is an aspect of smell in there.
 

Falconer

Registered Member
I'm veggie because I just plain don't like meat (love my leather jacket, though ;P), and while I definitely don't love the smell of meat, I can sort of stand it, if I have to. It kind of makes my nose twitch in the bad ways, especially bacon, pork sausages, that sort of thing (I'm more okay with chicken, perhaps because it's less objectionable. But that's a subjective opinion, come to think of it...)

I do wonder about the sensibility of making vegetarianism a medical thing, mind. "Oh yeah, I'm genetically predisposed to ADHD, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Random!11!!!!one! Insanity!!, and vegetarianism." ... let's hope not. :p
 

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
I don't think it's about making it a medical thing as such. Most people who are vegetarian don't see it as a bad thing, but a personal choice they are proud of, so even if there was some genetic thing (which I think might only be for a small minority) I doubt it will ever be like ADHD etc, with people panicking about thinking they have something wrong with them.
 

dobzy

Registered Member
Interesting article. I'm going to forward the link to one of my vegetarian friends, who simply has never been fond of meat.

I'm not a vegetarian, but I mostly eat chicken. Growing up, I ate much more meat. Now that I have control over what I eat, I have beef probably once a month... like the Yakiniku I had this past weekend... yum!
 

sunrise

aka ginger warlock
V.I.P.
I have never really sat down with anyone who is either a vegi or a vegan and asked them why they lead the lifestyle they do, its their personal choice and more power to them. I am not sure if it is a genetics thing though, I remember in the film "about a boy" it had a great line (by the way I am adlibbing as I have not seen the film in some time but this is the jist):

Marcus: mum, did you always know I would be a vegetarian
Fiona: no, but I am a vegetarian, I buy the food so I choose what you eat
Marcus: would you mind if I went to McDonalds
Fiona: I won't stop you from going to McDonalds, I would just be disappointed
Marcus: don't worry mum, I won't go to McDonalds

Now I am not saying this is the case for everyone, or that genetics doesn't have an impact but I do believe that if a child is brought up in a vegi/vegan environment it would certainly have an effect.
 

BigBob

Registered Member
My buddy, a big meat eater for 25 years, quit eating meat because he watched videos on how they make he the hamburger. So obviously it's not the same for everyone. People just grow into and out of certain foods.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
That makes sense because there are foods I won't eat because I just don't like the way they smell and looks could come into play too. I also find I don't like meat or cheese as much as I use to so I think peoples taste can change.
 

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
Now I am not saying this is the case for everyone, or that genetics doesn't have an impact but I do believe that if a child is brought up in a vegi/vegan environment it would certainly have an effect.
I grew up with a vegetarian sister, then when I was older I became vegetarian as well. I think growing up with a veggie sister may have helped a bit. My family was already used to have a vegetarian in the house so they didn't have to change anything etc. I think the family factor does play a huge role in this too.
 

oxyMORON

A Darker Knight
People are also vegetarian for religious reasons.

After enough time of not eating meat, people's bodies just reject it. Maybe there are genetic predispositions towards certain kinds of foods, but the fact still remains that we have the teeth and digestive system to eat all sorts of foods.
 
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