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Question US English Question - Jellyfish

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
I have a question about US English that I've been curious about for a while.

In most English-speaking countries, jelly looks like this:



Therefore, jellyfish are named after it since they look the same and have the same texture and consistency. (or maybe it was the other way around, either way same thing). But I know the word jelly in the US means something else, it instead refers to the jam-like spread you would put on toast or something. This spread which looks nothing at all like the animal.

In America are they still called jellyfish, even though American jelly doesn't actually relate to it at all? Or do you call them jell-ofish?
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I shall make this one easy for you.

Jellyfish


Jell-o


Jelly


Jam/Preserves




Jelly and Jam are different. Jam actually has chunks of fruit in it. For example, if I were to get strawberry jam it would have chunks and mashed strawberries in there mixed with what would otherwise be considered just jelly. Jelly is very smooth and is much more like a pure soft gelatin (though it certainly spreads more easily), it's also more artificial than jam.

Jam is also synonymous with the word "preserves" if you've ever seen that anywhere.
 

Smelnick

Creeping On You
V.I.P.
In Canada, jelly is the same as what dDave posted. Its made using gelatin crystals and the natural sugar and juice extract from the fruit. What you call jelly, we call jell-o as well. Yes, its a brand name, but its a brand name that's been around so long, its been adapted into being the name of the dessert. None of the ways are wrong, just different vernaculars for different regions.
------
Oh and yes, we do call them jellyfish as well. That's the world wide name :D
 
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Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
Thanks Dave. I mostly wanted to know whether American's still called them Jellyfish, even though by the definitions of the words and the food they should be called Jellofish in that country.
 

Konshentz

Konshentz
Jell-O is a brand name. It just kind of stuck for gelatin desserts. Calling a jellyfish a jellofish would be retarded.
 

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
I didn't know that Kons, that makes a lot of sense actually. Sort of like how Q-tip is a brand name that just stuck with that product.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
The American word "jelly" didn't come from jellyfish. It comes from the French word for congeal, which is gelée. Jelly and jellyfish are completely unrelated.

The dessert is usually referred to as gelatin or the brand name Jell-O.
 

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
It's actually not unrelated. The name jellyfish comes from the fact that the body of jellyfish looks like the UK English definition of Jelly as they are both wobbly, clear and gelatinous in appearance. What I'm trying to say is, that definition doesn't work for the US. As jelly there means the preserve you put on bread instead, which we call jam. The body of a jellyfish looks like jelly, but doesn't look like jam. So American's calling them jellyfish is the same as us calling them jamfish.
 
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