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Unemployment at 9.2 percent as jobs stall

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Unemployment at 9.2 percent as jobs stall - Washington Times

Me and a few co-workers were talking this morning and someone brought this up, so I decided to look it up.

I know there's a few Americans here that are having a hard time with this, so I was just wondering what your thoughts were?
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
It's not breaking any records, and it's not as high as it was last year apparently ( United States Unemployment data ), but it's still really sad to hear about...a lot of people are still going through rough times, and while I've heard that things are slowly moving towards improvement compared to last year it's also going through stalls in the process. The stall thing is what I heard during a White House press conference this morning, at least. I just hope that things start to improve ASAP and that people are able to find work.

One of my older brothers is a social worker with quite a few years under his belt, and he noted to me a few months ago that it's been tougher for people to find a job in the field than he's ever seen. Social work isn't an easy job to get, but it's a job that usually has a big market. To me that's just a relevant sign of the times that relates to these percentage numbers that we've been seeing over recent years. Hopefully I'll be saying in another thread like this that I've been hired, soon.
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I also thought that this chart from the Bureau of Labor Statistics here in the U.S. was interesting and related to this topic, so if people want to link it to discussion or just want to look at it when considering unemployment numbers in the future, feel free:

Current Unemployment Rates for States and Historical Highs/Lows

It looks at current unemployment rates for each of the 50 states, and also shows each of the states' historic high and low levels of unemployment.
 
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MenInTights

not a plastic bag
It's not breaking any records, and it's not as high as it was last year apparently ( United States Unemployment data ), but it's still really sad to hear about...a lot of people are still going through rough times, and while I've heard that things are slowly moving towards improvement compared to last year it's also going through stalls in the process. The stall thing is what I heard during a White House press conference this morning, at least. I just hope that things start to improve ASAP and that people are able to find work.

One of my older brothers is a social worker with quite a few years under his belt, and he noted to me a few months ago that it's been tougher for people to find a job in the field than he's ever seen. Social work isn't an easy job to get, but it's a job that usually has a big market. To me that's just a relevant sign of the times that relates to these percentage numbers that we've been seeing over recent years. Hopefully I'll be saying in another thread like this that I've been hired, soon.
------
I also thought that this chart from the Bureau of Labor Statistics here in the U.S. was interesting and related to this topic, so if people want to link it to discussion or just want to look at it when considering unemployment numbers in the future, feel free:

Current Unemployment Rates for States and Historical Highs/Lows

It looks at current unemployment rates for each of the 50 states, and also shows each of the states' historic high and low levels of unemployment.
The most amazing thing about the link you posted was the 3.2% rate in ND. Parts of ND have less than 1% unemployment and McDonalds jobs are paying $15/hr. They are experiencing an energy boom because of new drilling techniques and an openness to explore. There are many states that could replicate what ND is doing. Energy production has some of the best paying jobs and a huge support system that spawns many other jobs.

Its encouraging because even though things look bad, they can turn around. There are ways out of this mess.
 
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