U.N.: 14,000 Iraqis killed in 2006

Discussion in 'Politics & Law' started by Kazmarov, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. Kazmarov

    Kazmarov For a Free Scotland

    http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/07/18/iraq.main/index.html

    Just found this statistic interesting, as it shows that Iraq is very much not a country of peace and order yet.
     

  2. IntheNet

    IntheNet Guest

    Kaz... interesting number... you should also post the number of Iraqis killed by Saddam Hussein on a yearly basis (Kurds et al.) before the United States freed the nation of this dictator...
     
  3. Kazmarov

    Kazmarov For a Free Scotland

    I'm not saying it's an improvement, but over 100,000 innocent Iraqis have been killed in the last three years. Liberation, and the ensuing occupation has only marginally helped regular Iraqis.

    If you want to post the figures, do it.
     
  4. SenatorB

    SenatorB J.S.P.S

    That is an interestingly large number... the idea is that hopefully the inexcusable number of deaths now will pay off in the long run and ultimately make things better for everyone involved. I can only hope that this is true (and wish that they were able to accomplish the same ends with a different means).
     
  5. Plus Ultra

    Plus Ultra Guest

    Seems a rather low estimate, didn't The Lancet calculate over 100 thousand always innocent civilians had been wantomly (with malice aforethought and callous disregard for human life) been slaughtered by the infidels over a year ago?
     
  6. Kazmarov

    Kazmarov For a Free Scotland

    Well, this is about 5-6 months in 2006, in ways that can be directly defined to the Iraqi conflict. I think it's a decent estimate, considering that a lot of Iraq is not well documented.
     
  7. Plus Ultra

    Plus Ultra Guest

    If 14 thousand Iraqis were killed in the first 6 months of 2006, I'd expect a similar number were killed in the 6 preceding months, so about 28 thousand would be killed per year. With 3 years of intervention we'd get 84 thousand civilian casualties which is 16 thousand less than what The Lancet estimated more than a year ago.
     

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