The verb "Try" followed by a gerund/infinitive.

Dabs

Registered Member
#12
When I first saw the OP....my right off thought was...try to get there as fast as you can.
That is how the students are taught in our schools here~
 

Tucker

Lion Rampant
#13
Here are a few other examples my book mentions:

A: The photocopier doesn't seem to be working.
B: Try pressing the green button.
___________________________

A: I've got a terrible headache. I wish it would go.
B: Have you tried taking an aspirin?
____________________

"I rang the doorbell, but there was no answer. Then I tried knocking on the door, but there was still no answer".
The use of a gerund in these examples implies that the action is assumed to be possible and only the outcome is in question. "I tried pressing the button" means that I did press the button (though perhaps with negative results), while "I tried to press the button" means that I attempted to press it but was unable. Make sense?
 

NINnerd

Survived a M&G with Trent
#14
I've learned that the verb "TRY" can be followed by a verb either in infinitive or gerund.

Here are the examples I have on my English book

"I tried to move the table, but it was too heavy so I couldn't move it"

"I didn't like the way the furniture was arranged, so I tried moving the table to the other side of the room"


I think I perfectly understand the differences between those two. In the first the effort is over (that's why it should be used the infinitive). In the second the effort is not over yet, that's why it should be used the gerund).


Now I'm taking additional exercises on a website and here's one of the questions:

1.Try __ there as fast as you can.

a. getting

b. to get

c. got

d. get


In my opinion, the right answer would be "getting" but the website told me it's "to get" because it should be done an effort.

But according what I've learned, during the effort we use gerunds.


Sounds contradictory.
I believe the reason you would choose "to get" is because this is a command you are giving someone of something that will happen in the future. Therefore, there is no action happening right now.
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The use of a gerund in these examples implies that the action is assumed to be possible and only the outcome is in question. "I tried pressing the button" means that I did press the button (though perhaps with negative results), while "I tried to press the button" means that I attempted to press it but was unable. Make sense?
Also, Tucker is right here. You are telling someone to "try" to do something. So it isn't clear if it's possible yet. Just another idea. :)
 
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