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The Moon needs a name

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I was wondering why our moon has no name. We don't refer to earth or other planets in our solar system as 'the planet,' even other moons have names but not ours. I think the moon deserves a name as well. She is important to us after all.

What do you think?
 

Rapier

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
Smith. After Kate Smith.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I like that name Smith. Basic and a lot of people will think its named after them.

Or how about George, after George Washington.
 

Rapier

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I like that name Smith. Basic and a lot of people will think its named after them.

Or how about George, after George Washington.
The First Lady of Radio, was an American singer.

 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
By the light of the silvery Kate. Doesn't ring well. By the light of the silvery Smith or silver Smith, that sounds better.

I think we should give her a name fitting for her stature. Something from ancient Greek or Egypt. I would say ISIS but that name has been ruined.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I thought Luna was just the Latin word for moon, not really a name.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
The usual English proper name for Earth's natural satellite is "the Moon".[10][11] The noun moon derives from moone (around 1380), which developed from mone (1135), which derives from Old English mōna (dating from before 725), which, like all Germanic language cognates, ultimately stems from Proto-Germanic *mǣnōn.[12] Occasionally the name "Luna" is used, for example for a personified Moon in poetry, or to distinguish it from other moons in science fiction.[13]

The principal modern English adjective pertaining to the Moon is lunar, derived from the Latin Luna. A less common adjective is selenic, derived from the Ancient Greek Selene (Σελήνη), from which the prefix "seleno-" (as in selenography) is derived.[14][15]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon#Name_and_etymology

I don't think that is an official name. We call other planets natural satellites moons but we also give them official names such as Titan.
 

The_Chameleon

Grandmaster
While it is true that the sun and moon don't have "official" names, the names Sol and Luna would be consistent with the system of naming that has thus far been most widely used to name the other bodies in our Solar system. That being, naming them after Roman gods. Luna and Sol are the roots of the words Lunar and Solar, meaning "Of the moon" and "Of the sun" based on this mythology so you could say that they have long been the "unofficial" names of the moon and sun.


- Cham
 
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