Support Groups

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
#1
Has anyone here ever been to a support group, for what ever reason? Do you think they work? Would you consider going to one if the need ever arises.

And just to be clear, I am talking about the "Fight Club" version of support groups, where you go and say "Hi, my name is Robert Paulson and I have cancer, or am an alcoholic or am a drug addict". What ever the case may be.

Would you want to discuss your deepest darkest secret/fear with like-minded people or do you find this to impersonal?
 

Pugz

Ms. Malone
V.I.P.
#2
It's a bit impersonal. I was nervous when i first went to counselling the first few times, i don't think i could open up to a bunch of strangers - i think my counsellor suggested i go while i was seeing her, but i don't like to socialize and be around people much... :/
 
#3
I've never been to one, myself.

Would you want to discuss your deepest darkest secret/fear with like-minded people or do you find this to impersonal?
Actually, the opposite. I would probably find it too personal... [or maybe I'm taking that the wrong way?]. I hate talking about problems, especially face to face. If I desperately wanted to seek help and support from people in a similar position, I would definitely try find a forum/online group or something before going to an actual meeting.
 

Iris

rainbow 11!
#4
I've been to a therapist, but I have never been to anything like that. I've been told by many people I should, but I can't really open up to a group of people like that. I would rather be one on one or just talk to the people who I am close to.
 
#5
When I was a teenager I had to attend a support group for teens who didn't realize that doors are not placed in each school hallway just to go in one and right out the other each morning. Obviously it was a big joke at the time, but if they had adrressed the underlying problem, who knows how many problems could have been avoided.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
#6
I agree with everyone so far. The great thing about this day and age we find ourselves in is that you can do almost anything online that you can do in real life. I suppose it's easier to open up if you do not have to look someone in the eyes.

Back to one part of my question though - do you think that these support groups work/help? Let's not take illness here, but rather some sort of addiction. Does sharing your addiction with a group of people help you stop? Why not just have the self-control to do it yourself? What makes it easier when you are responsible to other people?
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
#7
I think that being accountable to someone is immensely helpful. Anyone who has become and stayed sober through Alcoholics Anonymous will tell you the same thing.

If it were not for the Internet, I might have tried to find a local support group for stepmoms and people who are dating people with kids. It's a difficult thing to do and it helps to know that others share your struggles.
 
#8
I don't know, CG, I think it can go both ways. Each person handles addiction in a different way, and what works for one may not work for another. Some people may feel comforted in the knowledge that they are not alone and are able to share their experiences with like individuals.
On the other hand, someone else may run home and feed that addiction due the stress of sharing it with the group.
The nice thing is, there are so many options out there for everyone to explore and find which niche they fit into when it comes to recovery.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
#9
If it were not for the Internet, I might have tried to find a local support group for stepmoms and people who are dating people with kids. It's a difficult thing to do and it helps to know that others share your struggles.
I think we should start like a support thread on GF. It's amazing how you can find people with the same struggles as you. It just so happens that my last BF had a son as well. I too found this extremely challanging. I am afraid to say it was a battle that I lost in the end.

While I get that having someone to be responsible to helps, I just still think that if you have the strength to stop a habbit when you are accountable to a third person, you also have the strength in you to stop if you are accountable to yourself only!
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#10
I had an online support group for people dealing with steplife. I don't go there anymore but kept in touch with some of them who became long term friends (on and offline).