Strange, Far Places

ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
#1
"Searchers after horror haunt strange, far places." -H. P. Lovecraft

Patches of matter in the universe seem to be moving at very high speeds and in a uniform direction that can't be explained by any of the known gravitational forces in the observable universe. Astronomers are calling the phenomenon "dark flow."

The stuff that's pulling this matter must be outside the observable universe, researchers conclude.

[...]

A theory called inflation posits that the universe we see is just a small bubble of space-time that got rapidly expanded after the Big Bang. There could be other parts of the cosmos beyond this bubble that we cannot see.

In these regions, space-time might be very different, and likely doesn't contain stars and galaxies (which only formed because of the particular density pattern of mass in our bubble). It could include giant, massive structures much larger than anything in our own observable universe. These structures are what researchers suspect are tugging on the galaxy clusters, causing the dark flow.

"The structures responsible for this motion have been pushed so far away by inflation, I would guesstimate they may be hundreds of billions of light years away, that we cannot see even with the deepest telescopes because the light emitted there could not have reached us in the age of the universe," Kashlinsky said in a telephone interview. "Most likely to create such a coherent flow they would have to be some very strange structures, maybe some warped space time. But this is just pure speculation."
-source

So unfathomably huge things that warp space/time and exist outside the observable universe, may be yanking on stuff in the universe. Huh....
 
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Chaos

Epic Gamer
V.I.P.
#2
Interesting. On the other hand, maybe it's God, or little green men pulling tricks on the silly Humans...

The point is, we can never know such things. Certainly not in our lifetimes, and maybe not even in the course of Humanity's existence. It would be interesting to find out, but who's to say our Universe will even exist in the time it would take to find something like that out? :dunno:
 

ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
#3
I'd say we have no way of knowing if we're going to have a way of knowing. Who knows what developments will be made in science, and what new things will be discovered?
 

Chaos

Epic Gamer
V.I.P.
#4
That's true. We have no way of knowing if we have any way of knowing about any way of knowing anything....

:dazed:

That's some real quantum shit. :shake:


It'd be interesting as hell to know though. :hmm:
 

Bananas

Endangered Species
#5
Should these little monkeys be pondering over such things!

Thats some pretty interesting stuff but all it does is add to the mystery of what is out there, our place and even our universes place within it. Sometimes those monkeys impress me.
 

Nick-Aotmzgin

Registered Member
#6
Not just the speculation is that in 8-10 years from now (and its in progress) we will establish life on space buildings pipe and electric foundation etc...\
Nasa posted couple of interesting videos on the Nasa offical website presenting the progress and the space shuttles exploreing the environment in space, i am sure and convinced that there is a new civilization in space and much more advanced and complicated technology and structers!
 

ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
#7
As a follow-up on my OP, I recently read an article in Discover Magazine which talked about the possibility of two universes colliding. Apparently, the math says that if it were to happen, the universe with the smaller gravitational constant (or some physical constant, I forget precisely which) would obliterate--or at least severely maim--the other. Furthermore, the math says that if our universe were to get the short straw of such a clash, the other universe would appear as a reflective wall bearing down on us until our unfortunate demise. It also mentioned that a collision that occurred long ago when our universe was young could potentially account for an anomaly observed in the cosmic microwave background radiation (which allows us to 'see' the early universe, jsyk).

In any case, there's no reason right now to have any confidence that there even are other universes, but the idea seems to be gaining some traction as a result of various observations, calculations, and whatnot. Either way, I find this all pretty fascinating.
 
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Gevok

Registered Member
#8
There's more worlds out there other than Our galaxy, and even in our universe, maybe we don't know it; but our universe could only be a spec in the dust compared to all the other worlds.