Stem cells can be trained to kill HIV

Merc

Certified Shitlord
V.I.P.
#1
ScienceDaily (Dec. 9, 2009) — Researchers from the UCLA AIDS Institute and colleagues have for the first time demonstrated that human blood stem cells can be engineered into cells that can target and kill HIV-infected cells -- a process that potentially could be used against a range of chronic viral diseases.
Read the whole story here:

Stem cells can be engineered to kill HIV, scientists show

That's fucking awesome, score another one for stem cells.
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#4
I think this is great. Doing more and more stem cell research seems like a no brainer to me.
I agree, I've voted Yes on every Pro-Stem Cell bill thats come my way. I'm very Pro-stem cell research. Much like you said, its a no-brainer to further push our knowledge of what they can do, even if it means "playing god".
 
#5
It seems like Stem Cells really are the answer for so many of our problems. i remember when this was a huge controversial issue like a decade ago. Hopefully this will provide more funding for the research, this is awesome to read.
 

Merc

Certified Shitlord
V.I.P.
#6
It seems like Stem Cells really are the answer for so many of our problems. i remember when this was a huge controversial issue like a decade ago. Hopefully this will provide more funding for the research, this is awesome to read.
That's because a lot of misinformed politicians like a certain guy with a name that sounds like Beorge Gush thought that allowing stem cell researching was going to lead to baby farms where fetuses were harvested for their cells.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
#7
Are these embryonic stem cells? Or adult ones? And if they are embryonic - could we have done the same thing with adult stem cells?

From what I've heard (albeit a while ago) basically all breakthroughs we've had were with adult stem cells.

While exciting news, it should be kept in mind at this stage the research is still a proof-of-concept experiment done in mice; it shows that the technique is feasible at successfully destroying the virus-infected cells, but is still not ready for the clinic.