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Space Photographs

Comet

Registered Member
Post some amazing space images.

Here are some nice pictures of the Butterfly Nebula located in the constellation Scorpius in our very own Milky Way galaxy. It is approximately four-thousand light years away. The "wings" are gas and dust which compose the outer-layer of the star and stretch out a few light years.









 
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Comet

Registered Member
Meet Messier 17 in the Sagittarius constellation. It's over five thousand light years away in our very own galaxy. The area has many stars clustered together. The heat from which causes the gases to become very visible.

 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
I like going to the APOD, coz I'm a geek like that. This was the photo of the day on April 29th 2011, The Antennae.



Today's photo looks a little boring, so I decided against that one.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
Thank you, Curious Girl. Feel free to post more images.
I wouldn't mind doing the "Astronomy Picture of the Day" everyday. I would love to see more threads and discussions on this topic. I'm counting on you Comet. Make it happen.
 

Dekzper

Registered Member
Awesome photos, Comet! :) And I def hope CuriousGirl gets involved too! This is a photo of Jupiter's moon Io. It's 2,256 miles (3,630 km) in diameter which is about 200 km larger than our moon. The surface is covered with active volcanoes.



This is a photo of the volcanic eruption at Tvashtar catena on Io, taken November 25, 1999 by the Galileo spacecraft. Tvashtar catena is a chain of calderas. The hot, molten lava fountains are sulfur dioxide and rise to about 5,000 feet (1.5 km) above the surface. The darkest regions are from the most recent eruptions. The temperature on Io is about -238*F (-150*C) but the region around the eruption was about 2,780*F (1,527*C). The photo was taken 11,000 miles (17,000 km) from the surface of Io.



This is a features map of Io for anyone that's interested. The dark spot near the center is Loki patera, where the Voyager 1 spacecraft took photos of the famous Loki eruption, March 8, 1979.
Click on the link at the bottom to get the original size and you can read the names on the map. Btw, our Flikr account name (Goppie) was my little brother's idea, NOT mine, lol.


All sizes | Map of Io, Jupiter | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

This is the closest region of massive star formation (and planet formation) to Earth. The Orion nebula (aka Messier 42, M42, & NGC1976) is a diffuse nebula south of Orion's belt and is about 1,344 light years away. The gases in the nebula are very turbulent and it is about 24 light years across. This is the nebula scientists use most to study star formation and proto-planets.



This is the Horsehead nebula (aka Barnard 33). It's a dark nebula in the Orion constellation, south of the star Alnitak, and 1,500 light years away. The red gas in the background is hydrogen gas, ionized by the star Sigma Orionis. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funelled by a strong magnetic field.



I def look foreward to seeing other peoples photos! :nod:
 

Dekzper

Registered Member
I wanna get more into the Cassini and Galileo missions later. But here's some awesome shots of a really important galaxy and nebula.

The Andromeda galaxy is the closest spiral galaxy to our own solar system. It's about 2.54 million light years away and expected to collide with our Milky Way galaxy in about 4.5 billion years.
Other names are Messier 31, M31, and NGC 224. It's 70,000-120,000 light years across but if you add the extended stellar disk, discovered in 2005, it's actually about 220,000 light years across. It's a lot larger than our galaxy and has about 1 trillion stars - our galaxy has 200-400 billion stars.

It may be the closest "spiral" galaxy but the closest galaxy (of any kind) is the Canis Major Dwarf galaxy discovered in 2003. That's an irregular galaxy that's 25,000 light years from our solar system and has about 1 billion stars and a lot of those are red giants. It's in the Canis Major Constellation. The 2nd closest is the Sagittarius Dwarf Eliptical galaxy which is about 75,000 light years away.
Anyway, this is the Andromeda galaxy:



This is the Tarantula nebula. The weird shape was caused by supernovas in that nebula. The 1987 supernova is the closest supernova to Earth that has been discovered. It also has the brightest known pulsar.
The second pic is a close up shot.





I wanted to toss this photo in too! :D This is a photo of Launch Pad 39A and the space shuttle Endeavor just before the last space shuttle launch a few days ago! If you look at the 3 men at the bottom of the photo, in the center, you can get just how massive the whole thing is.



Thanks to whoever moved the thread! It was tuff remembering where it was, lol!
 
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idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
Can't look at that galaxy and not think about the Whirlpool Galaxy (also from the Messier family, so to say). :lol:

The Whirlpool Galaxy was the first to be recognised as a spiral galaxy. The circular disk has a radius of 38,000 light years. In the heart of the spiral is a black hole surrounded with dust.







Then, inside the black hole in the Whirlpool Galaxy, you can find this GEM.

 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
These are pictures of the Milky Way galaxy viewed from Earth...they really blew me away, to be honest. Especially on the first one, it almost looks like something out of science fiction. It surprises me that views of space like this are so close to home. The first caption also has an interesting fact or two included.


  • I'm curious, has anyone ever seen a good view of the Milky Way galaxy with your naked eye (or a camera of your own)?

Anyway, the pictures and captions below are from: Views of the Milky Way Galaxy Photos | Views of the Milky Way Galaxy Pictures - Yahoo! News


The Milky Way is home to over 200 billion stars and 50 billion planets. These incredible photos capture what we can see of the immense beauty of our galaxy. (Photo: Eric Hines Photography/Flickr )





  • The Milky Way over a dirt road in Wyoming. (Photo: Eric Hines Photography/Flickr )
  • The Milky Way over Clinton Gulch, Colorado. (Photo: Daniel G McVey/Flickr)
  • Devils Tower in Wyoming captured with a stunning view of the Milky Way. (Photo: Eric Hines Photography/Flickr)
  • The Milky Way glows in this landscape with a silhouetted tree. (Photo: Eric Hines Photography/Flickr )
  • Lake City, Colorado's view of the Milky Way. (Photo: Michael_Underwood/Flickr)
  • The Milky Way as seen from Auburn, Alabama. (Photo: Scott Fillmer/Flickr)
  • More Milky Way from Auburn. (Photo: Scott Fillmer/Flickr)
 

Comet

Registered Member
This is a cluster created from two cluster galaxies that merged. The pink hue is gas that separates the clusters, shown in blue.

 
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