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Sharia Law In America

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
Wow... It almost sounds immoral and wrong when you put it like that... :rolleyes:

We've been down this road many times before. So... it's your turn to explain WHY it's discriminatory for a Christian baker not to bake a cake for a gay wedding. WHY is it immoral to deny them service?
Well, let's first look at the dictionary definition of discrimination. This is from Merriam-Webster:

discrimination - the practice of unfairly treating a person or group of people differently from other people or groups of people

Based on the definition, I would say it's pretty clear that not offering the same service to gays that heterosexuals can receive is discrimination. One group is being treated differently (and unfairly) from another group.

What if a company like Comcast decided that they wanted to stop offering cable TV and internet service to gays because homosexuality is against their religious beliefs? Is that any different? To me, the only difference is the size of the company when compared to a bakery.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
Well, let's first look at the dictionary definition of discrimination. This is from Merriam-Webster:

discrimination - the practice of unfairly treating a person or group of people differently from other people or groups of people

Based on the definition, I would say it's pretty clear that not offering the same service to gays that heterosexuals can receive is discrimination. One group is being treated differently (and unfairly) from another group.

What if a company like Comcast decided that they wanted to stop offering cable TV and internet service to gays because homosexuality is against their religious beliefs? Is that any different? To me, the only difference is the size of the company when compared to a bakery.
Key word there being "unfairly". I'd argue it's unfair to force a Christian to bake a cake for a wedding that they are 100% morally opposed to.

Asking a Christian if they would bake a cake for a gay wedding is more of a "gotcha" question than anything else in my view. I feel like it's something that's brought up every time the gay marriage discussion comes around just to trip up Christians and try to smear us as hateful bigots.

Comcast is not comparable to a bakery, not in this example. Asking someone to bake (and therefore be directly involved with) a cake for a gay wedding is a big deal. You're really helping the event more forward in a big way. If you're gay and want me to bake for a different event (maybe you and your friends are having a new years party or a summer barbecue) then I'd be happy to do so.

Guess what? You're free to be gay, I'm not going to stop you. Doesn't mean that I don't fundamentally believe that it's wrong.

Why would a gay couple even want someone to bake them a cake that didn't want to? Kind of like why in the world would a gay couple want to get married in a church that fundamentally believes homosexuality is wrong? Bring your business somewhere where it's appreciated and stop complaining about how terrible the Christians are for believing and actually practicing what their own scriptures say.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
Wait, what? Are you saying Islam should be banned here? (I don't actually know where you live, but I've always assumed you live in the US. Sorry if I'm wrong.)
My bad. I shoulda said "letting those Muslims live here is just stupid." - The ones that dont respect US laws or hate on America.
Even where I was born the Muslims have their own mosques and they are mostly peaceful - except some serious nutjobs in Chechnya. So yeah Muslims are cool but not the ones that want the courts to accept their stupid sharia laws. Imo thats extremism and America believes in separation of church and state.

Anyway Christians cant tell the courts what to do so Muslims shouldnt either. The courts in America are all about law and not religion. If those Muslims want to live under sharia law then they should move to a Muslim country.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
Key word there being "unfairly". I'd argue it's unfair to force a Christian to bake a cake for a wedding that they are 100% morally opposed to.

Comcast is not comparable to a bakery, not in this example. Asking someone to bake (and therefore be directly involved with) a cake for a gay wedding is a big deal. You're really helping the event more forward in a big way. If you're gay and want me to bake for a different event (maybe you and your friends are having a new years party or a summer barbecue) then I'd be happy to do so.
It's not even about the cake. The cake is irrelevant. It's about denying a service to a certain group of people when that same service is provided to everyone else.

What if the limo transporting the wedding party to the wedding locale has to stop for gas on its way there, but the gas station owner is morally opposed to gay marriage? Allowing them to purchase gas there would be helping the event move forward.

The wedding is also irrelevant though. What if the owner of a clothing store overhears two shoppers talking about picking out some new clothes to wear to a gay club? The owner, being morally opposed to homosexuality in general because of his or her religion, denies them service.

What's the difference between the baker or the gas station owner not offering service to a gay couple who is going to get married, and the clothing store owner not offering service to gays period? In both cases, the owners are morally opposed to something for religious reasons. Why is there a special exception being made here for weddings?

So now that the wedding is irrelevant, what's the difference between a business not serving gays and a business not serving Jews or blacks or women, etc? There is no difference at all. All of them are discrimination, and doing it for religious reasons doesn't make it any less discriminatory, just like committing murder for religious reasons doesn't make it less of a murder.


Asking a Christian if they would bake a cake for a gay wedding is more of a "gotcha" question than anything else in my view. I feel like it's something that's brought up every time the gay marriage discussion comes around just to trip up Christians and try to smear us as hateful bigots.
You really think I want to smear you as a hateful bigot? I'm just trying to have a friendly discussion here. I even said to you in a recent conversation that you're a good person. So your theory is inaccurate.

Guess what? You're free to be gay, I'm not going to stop you. Doesn't mean that I don't fundamentally believe that it's wrong.
I may be a Wang Bro, but I'm not gay. ;)

Why would a gay couple even want someone to bake them a cake that didn't want to? Kind of like why in the world would a gay couple want to get married in a church that fundamentally believes homosexuality is wrong? Bring your business somewhere where it's appreciated and stop complaining about how terrible the Christians are for believing and actually practicing what their own scriptures say.
True, but also irrelevant. The desire of the gay couple doesn't make the actions of the baker any less discriminatory. Why would a black person want to eat at a restaurant that doesn't want to serve blacks? I think most people would agree that it's discriminatory to not serve blacks even if blacks don't want to eat there.
 
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