Registering Felons to Vote?

Discussion in 'Politics & Law' started by IntheNet, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. IntheNet

    IntheNet Guest

    Wow...

    The Jacksonville Sun
    http://www.jacksonsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060905/NEWS01/609050306/1002
    NASHVILLE - "Two civil rights organizations are canvassing the state with town hall meetings - including one Thursday in Jackson - to explain a new election law intended to make it easier for felons to restore their voting rights. But even advocates of the bill passed in May say Tennessee still has one of the most restrictive and confusing procedures for allowing former felons to regain the right to vote."

    ~

    I think this is a bad idea on several fronts; most especially since it is being pushed by both the NAACP and the ACLU, thus one can be assured that voting Democrat is the desired result from the Town Hall Meetings...
     

  2. Ant On A Log

    Ant On A Log Guest

    You think it's just a bad idea because black people and pinko commies want more people to vote Democrat?

    I think it's a good idea for black people and pinko commies to vote Democrat, so there!

    I also think it's a good idea for felons to vote. It isn't like they aren't part of American society, and if the whole system is about "bringing people back in society" why do they take away someone's basic rights to representation?

    I think your logic is flawed, too. Just because the ACLU and NAACP push for this doesn't mean that every felon allowed to vote is going to thank these organizations by voting Democrat. Just because some black dude gives me a cookie doesn't mean that I'm going to thank him by "never turning back" if you get what I mean. :)
     
  3. Kazmarov

    Kazmarov For a Free Scotland

    I think felons should be able to use their experience in prison and in the justice system to help vote for a party that can improve and balance the process. I don't have a problem with them voting: there are way worse things to penalize them with.

    Kaz
     
  4. Ant On A Log

    Ant On A Log Guest

    That's right! Vote for better prison food! Yeah!!!
     
  5. Kazmarov

    Kazmarov For a Free Scotland

    I was thinking more about the trial system, prison brutality, and crime prevention. But yeh, upping the Sloppy Joe's too.

    Voting's a rite, not a privilege. Felons pay taxes, and voting should not be revoked.

    Kaz
     
  6. Hoosier_Daddy

    Hoosier_Daddy Registered Member

    They should've thought about that before they committed the crime. If you're not willing to accept the responsibilities of citizenship, you shouldn't have the full benefits of citizenship.


    Hoosier.
     
  7. Ant On A Log

    Ant On A Log Guest

    So punishment for the crime is going to happen for the rest of their lives even after the actual punishment (jail)? Why don't we just lock up everyone forever after they've bought a nickel bag on the corner for 5 bucks?

    Punishments are dictated by society. In the same line of thought, society has determined that not every crime is as severe as the next, that means that someone who goes to jail for 14 days, say, for probation violation isn't the same "caliber" of criminal as your rapist or murderer.

    So why treat all criminals the same by taking away their right to vote even after the punishment is supposedly over?
     
  8. IntheNet

    IntheNet Guest

    Their civic duty is to follow our laws. Since criminals have shown they can't do that, why reward them with voting priviledges?
     
  9. Ant On A Log

    Ant On A Log Guest

    The right of representation isn't a priviledge. Under a system which picks and chooses who can and can't have certain rights, who is really free? Next, the government could tell someone that because they're gay they don't fit our model of society and don't get the right to vote, either. It's just a lot more fair to allow someone, no matter who they are or if they've been subject to our penal system, to have representation.
     
  10. Hoosier_Daddy

    Hoosier_Daddy Registered Member

    Not a felonious act, so it's irrelevant.

    Again, we're discussing convicted felons. Not everyone convicted of a crime is a felon.

    Here's why I like the law as it's written in the 48 states that deny convicted felons the opportunity to vote.

    I don't want to see felons convicted of rape voting for candidates who are soft on sex crimes against women.

    I don't want to see felons convicted of tax fraud voting for candidates who are able to legislate tax reform.

    I don't want to see felons convicted of molestation voting for candiates who are able to legislate laws on pedophiles.

    I could go on and on with every violent crime, but I think you get my point. Just as I have a right to be the custodial guardian of my children, I would sacrifice that right were I to committ an act of violence or sexual assault against one of them. The same logic applies here in regards to convicted felons. They had the right to vote and chose to give it up by commiting a felonious crime against our society.


    Hoosier.
     

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