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Reductionalism

KSpiceFantastic

Haters gonna hate.
Do you think that everything in the universe can be explained by one unifying theme? If so, what?

By definition, reductionalism links different contexts together, meaning for example...

Economics came from sociology, sociology from psychology, psych from biology, biology from chemistry, chemistry from physics... and so on...

I personally think that there is no unifying theme yet known, but what do you think?
 

generalblue

Where is my Queen?
If I could answer this question, this would solve all the mysterious of the universe sorry but I don't really have an answer for this just due to the fact that I 'believe' everything is linked in some sort of way . I definetly believe that there is one link that we have not discovered, and probably never discover, that can answer all the questions about life and the universe.

But I have the answer.
42 :lol:
 
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Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
Chaos?

That'd be the only answer I could come up with. The ultimate truth that the universe is unpredictable and without pattern much like many other facets of our lives.
 

KSpiceFantastic

Haters gonna hate.
Chaos makes sense for sure, but the universe is increasing in entropy over time so chaos is maybe the closest thing to an answer.
 

Sim

Registered Member
Interesting question.

The answer is: 42.
 

KSpiceFantastic

Haters gonna hate.
genblue brought that up a couple of posts ago, but that is a jokey answer... haha.

If the unifying theme IS related to 42, then WTF.
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
Chaos?

That'd be the only answer I could come up with. The ultimate truth that the universe is unpredictable and without pattern much like many other facets of our lives.
I don't think it's chaotic. Just because we have the inability to understand how some phenomenon work this doesn't make them chaotic.
Actually, I don't think anything in the universe is chaotic.
There is only a complex regulation which is hard for us to understand.
 

KSpiceFantastic

Haters gonna hate.
I don't think it's chaotic. Just because we have the inability to understand how some phenomenon work this doesn't make them chaotic.
Actually, I don't think anything in the universe is chaotic.
There is only a complex regulation which is hard for us to understand.
The only thing that can be remotely chaotic about the universe is how it started (for non-creationists).
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
The only thing that can be remotely chaotic about the universe is how it started (for non-creationists).
But even that cannot be considered chaotic. Chaotic is something that doesn't make sense.
But something happened that brought the formation of the universe and this has to do with the nature laws which are not chaotic. They are just complex.
 

ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
KSpiceFantastic said:
The only thing that can be remotely chaotic about the universe is how it started (for non-creationists).
EllyDicious said:
But even that cannot be considered chaotic. Chaotic is something that doesn't make sense.
There's a famous experiment where light was shown through a couple slits in a board to see what pattern it'd form on the wall behind the board. If light consisted in particles--it was reasoned--you would end up w/ two slit shapes on the wall behind the board, as if you'd shot at it with a scattergun. That's not what happened. Instead, the light formed a number of slit shapes in what's called an "interference pattern": exactly what you would expect if light was a wave.

Of course, while light acts as a wave, it consists in particles. So another "double-slit experiment" was done with electrons instead of light. Electrons were fired one-by-one at a pair of slits to see where they ended up on a screen. One-by-one they fell into place to form an interference pattern, as if they were somehow interacting with each other across time. Whatever the cause of their strange behavior--assuming acting in such a way is just not a fundamental component of the particles--there is no way to predict exactly where a given electron will land.

Down to the irreducible particles that compose it: nature seems unpredictable. Not wholly unpredictable--an electron fired in a double-slit experiment will land within a predictable area--but enough so to say God may very well play dice.
 
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