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Realistically colored historical photos

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I saw this today and found it to be quite interesting.

To convert a black and white photo to color you have to use an algorithm that will interpret even the slightest difference in shades of gray and translate that to color.

Take a look at these...

Realistically colorized historical photos make the past seem incredibly real [36 pictures] | 22 Words

Those photos include well known people such as Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and Albert Einstein.

So many of the historical photos we have are from an age that has long since passed. I think that seeing everything in black and white sort of causes a disconnect and doesn't help us to see what we really should be seeing.

Anyway, I thought it was cool and worth sharing.
 

Taliesin

Registered Member
It is a pretty cool share, dDave.

I have to say though that I'm cool with seeing all of those images in their original black and white. I don't get that disconnect that you speak of... at least not in the way you seem to get it. For me it's more the fact that it's a flat image of a time that I can't possibly ever hope to experience. That's where the disconnect lies for me.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I don't know, black and white photos just seem boring and some of them look depressing. I just feel as if black and white photos, while they are what they had at the time, don't fully communicate how the times looked. It's interesting to see the colors because they show you what the style looked like, how houses looked, etc. it's important to see those thing in color.

I'm still impressed that someone figured out how to interpret black and white into color. They did this with the film It's a Wonderful Life as well.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
That's pretty amazing technology. Really interesting to see how some of those pictures are so much different in color. Especially the ones of people. I agree with the disconnect comment.

Thanks for sharing.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Nice photos, that kid in the Baltimore slums looked angry, probably had a hard life and little education considering it was the depression and there was no kind of social safety net at that time. Then the man setting himself on fire was also depressing. I wanted to smack the Nazi giving the Jewish photographer a dirty look.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
Then the man setting himself on fire was also depressing.
As depressing as that photo is, it was one of my favorites on that list. The orange of the flames and the orange of the robes of the monks in the background really hit a nerve for me.
 

Millz

Better Call Saul
Staff member
V.I.P.
I thought the Hindenburg disaster photo is really awesome...I have an obsession with Abe Lincoln was well so that one was cool too.

Good stuff here.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
As depressing as that photo is, it was one of my favorites on that list. The orange of the flames and the orange of the robes of the monks in the background really hit a nerve for me.
When I was looking at that photo I swear I could feel the mans pain. How horrible it must be to be on fire.
 

Elanor

Registered Member
I think the colour brings them to life. As much as I do like black and white photos, the colour helps to make them stand out more. The hydrogen bomb one is far more striking in colour, as is the Hindenberg photo.

Thanks for sharing Dave.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
When I was looking at that photo I swear I could feel the mans pain. How horrible it must be to be on fire.
Hard to believe he didn't utter a single sound while enduring excrutiating pain as he burned to death.
 
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