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Question

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
I'm getting interested in car modifications, and might like to try it out some time (not body mods, I despise them....). However, my knowledge of the inner workings of a car is...to be honest....p*** poor (censored so I can still see this page in college). I'm currently on a IT course with no chance of swapping over to a car mechanics course, and after this course I will have to pay for any further courses, as I will be too old to recieve free education. So what I want to know is this -

What would be the best way to self-teach myself mechanics?
 

Sephy

Forum Drifter
I would say to get yourself an old V-8 or something for cheap, and tear it down. Very fun and you get to learn a lot. Also, try out www.howstuffworks.com. They tell a little bit about how engines work. Granted it isn't great info, but it is very good for a beginner to understand some of the workings of an engine.
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
Sorry for not knowing, but what exactly is a V8...?
 

merob

Boom!
its an engine, w/ 8 cylinders.!!!
I learned that on howstuffworks.com myself. I shared some of the same interest. I went to a book store and bought a book on mechanics. It turned out it wasn't very useful, but I'd guess searching for the right books and studying would be the best way to learn.

EDIT! they're a few car magazines that include 'fix it' guides every issue. The information is hard to keep track of, but if you read long enough (and do a bit of research inbetween), you'd probably learn enough. I like sports Compact and Super Street - the cars are all modded, sry to say.
 

Sephy

Forum Drifter
V-8 means eights cylinders set up in a V formation. 4 on each side that go down and connect to the crankshaft.
 
9

9ten

Guest
Well, if you're unaware what a V8 is, first things first, read up the basic theory stuff on howstuffworks.com. What I did when I was learning was to read up on engine components, the difference between fuel injection and carburettored motors, what horsepower and torque are, the difference between a V engine, an I engine, a Boxer engine and a Rotary engine, what a turbo/supercharger is, and so on. And get a cheap car like what Sephy suggested. And ask questions. :)
 

Sephy

Forum Drifter
Yeah the most important part is to always ask. I grew up around it. My dad worked on cars. My uncle raced and my grandfather raced. My stepfather has also worked on cars. And me and my friends are into cars. I learned by watching and trial and error. And of course by asking when I didn't know something. I now know quite a bit, but I am still continously learning new things. I am currently working on my very first engine swap with a friend.

If you have any questions, just ask. I can help if I know the answer. :)
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
*stares out the window*

Well we have an old Rover Metro out in the drive, it failed the MOT so it isn't being used. However it's diesel engine, not a petrol engine.

Going to take me a while to get a petrol engine as well, I'm saving up for the Download '06 music festival, and I can only save £5-£10 a week.
 
9

9ten

Guest
Ah, you're English, different story. I was actually learning on an old Ford Sierra....but all I managed to do was change the battery, before my mum had the car crushed. :(

Try an old Ford.
 

Sephy

Forum Drifter
What does it matter if he's english? They are still built pretty much the same as far as internals. Diesels are different but still a great learning tool.
 
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