Question about BMI

Millz

LGB
Staff member
V.I.P.
#1
Should I take what the internet says my BMI is or not? Aren't there other factors that should be considered because my height, weight and gender?

This thing is trying to tell me I'm overweight. I'm 5'7", 165 pounds.

BMI is 25.8.

How is that overweight?
 

PretzelCorps

Registered Member
#2
Should I take what the internet says my BMI is or not? Aren't there other factors that should be considered because my height, weight and gender?

This thing is trying to tell me I'm overweight. I'm 5'7", 165 pounds.

BMI is 25.8.

How is that overweight?
I'm 5'7'', 170 - 175 pounds --> Internet BMIs tell me I'm apparently "dangerously overweight" all the time. :lol:


Ignore it --> Unless you're fat and not telling, you're probably rather muscular, and that throws impersonal BMI tests.
 

Millz

LGB
Staff member
V.I.P.
#3
I'm 5'7'', 170 - 175 pounds --> Internet BMIs tell me I'm apparently "dangerously overweight" all the time. :lol:


Ignore it --> Unless you're fat and not telling, you're probably rather muscular, and that throws impersonal BMI tests.
Okay I'm glad I'm not the only one haha. If I was 5'9" I'd be fine but since I'm two inches shorter I'm overweight...

I was just making sure because I've heard about BMI before but I wasnt sure what it all entailed.
 

Stab-o-Matic5000

Cutting Edge in Murder
#4
You have to take your BMI with a grain of salt. For instance, you could just be incredibly muscular and a BMI would tell you you're a fatty.

25.8 is just barely in the overweight category anyhow. So what if you've got a bit of a gut.

Funny thing is, I weigh 4 more pounds then you, but my BMI is 20.6. Then again, I am 9 inches taller.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#5
Should I take what the internet says my BMI is or not? Aren't there other factors that should be considered because my height, weight and gender?

This thing is trying to tell me I'm overweight. I'm 5'7", 165 pounds.

BMI is 25.8.

How is that overweight?
This article might interest you. Basically it says that BMI is not an accurate indicator of body fat. They made a new research about this a couple of years ago.

ScienceDaily (Mar. 7, 2007) — Body mass index, or BMI, long considered the standard for measuring the amount of fat in a person’s body, may not be as accurate as originally thought, according to new research.

A research team from Michigan State University and Saginaw Valley State University measured the BMI of more than 400 college students – some of whom were athletes and some not – and found that in most cases the student’s BMI did not accurately reflect his or her percentage of body fat. The research is published in the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.

BMI is determined by this equation: A person’s weight divided by his or her height squared. Generally a BMI of 25 or above indicates a person is overweight; 30 or above indicates obesity. A person with a higher BMI is thought to be at a greater risk of heart disease, diabetes and other weight-related problems.

“The overlying issue is the same criteria for BMI are used across the board,” said Joshua Ode, a Ph.D. student in the MSU Department of Kinesiology and an assistant professor of kinesiology at Saginaw Valley. “Whether you’re an athlete or a 75-year-old man, all the same cut points are used.”

“BMI should be used cautiously when classifying fatness, especially among college-age people,” said Jim Pivarnik, an MSU professor of kinesiology and epidemiology. “It really doesn’t do a good job of saying how fat a person really is.”

The problem, especially among younger people and athletes, is that BMI does not distinguish between body fat and muscle mass, said Ode.

“A previous study of NFL football players found that a large percentage of them – around 60 percent – were considered obese,” he said. “But when you look at an athlete like that, you see that in many cases he is not obese. Many athletes have huge BMIs because of muscle mass, but in many cases are not fat.”

The answer, said Pivarnik, is instead of having one cutoff point for everyone, perhaps have different classifications for different people.
“Is a BMI of 25 for overweight and 30 for obese the right ones to use with 20- to 29-year-olds in terms of disease risk?” he asked. “Maybe it could be as simple as this: If you’re a regular exerciser or an athlete, maybe 28 is overweight for you and 33 is considered obese.”

BMI, said Pivarnik, is used as a “surrogate” for percent fat, even though body fat doesn’t really fit into the equation.

“What if you take fat out of the equation?” he said. “Is there something
unique about BMI that may increase a person’s risk of chronic disease, unrelated to fatness? Are people with high BMIs but low fatness as much at risk of heart disease as other people? The answer is no one knows.”

In their research, Ode and Pivarnik used carefully measured height and weight to calculate BMI in more than 400 college-age people. They then used a standard method of measuring body fatness and found that BMI was not providing an accurate portrayal of the amount of fat a student had.

Other members of the research team included Mathew Reeves, an associate professor of epidemiology at MSU, and Jeremy Knous, a Ph.D. student in the MSU Department of Kinesiology.
 

AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
#6
As many have said, BMI index isn't really all that accurate for most people. I would suggest getting a body fat caliper if you really wanted to know accuracy.

Accu-Measure Body Fat Calipers


They also have electronic ones, but those are a bit expensive.
 

oeran

Registered Member
#8
According to BMI, I'm over 70 pounds overweight, but when I tell people that, they simply look at me and go, "Where is it all?" BMI started off as a vague measurement, in the same sense that "It's a stone's throw away" is, a way to measure people according to the averages of the people that they measured. It somehow got incredibly popular and people started taking it as the gospel truth in weight determination.

I go by waist-hip ratios, as I don't have a caliper. According to that, I'm just a little bit overweight.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
#9
BMI is retarded. All it takes into account are your height and weight, not body fat % or anything else. Basically Shaq is morbidly obese according to the BMI.
 

Stab-o-Matic5000

Cutting Edge in Murder
#10
BMI is retarded. All it takes into account are your height and weight, not body fat % or anything else. Basically Shaq is morbidly obese according to the BMI.
Besides, the name Body Mass Index should say it all. It's not a measurement of how fat you are, it's a measurement of how, you know, massive your body is based on your height. A guy who's short but stocky and well muscled would probably be in the high 20's range on the BMI, while a 6'8" guy who's packing a few pounds on, but has a thin frame would probably be in the low 20's.