Public speaking

#1
This afternoon I'll be doing two group presentations regarding life insurance and can't wait. The fact that I'm excited about this makes my co-workers think I'm a little crazy (which I am, but that's another subject)
I love public speaking, I would prefer standing in front of a room full of people and addressing them, than having a one on one conversation with someone.
What are your thoughts on getting in front of a room filled with people and having everyone's attention focused on you?
Love it, hate it?
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
#2
It doesn't bother me if I know what the hell I'm talking about, but I don't necessarily look forward to it, either.
 

Easily-Amused

http://easily-amused.com/
#3
i like both :)
one-on-one conversations have more flow to them, but when public speaking, you control where the topic goes. if you want a point made, it's made.
 

Iris

rainbow 11!
#4
I hate public speaking. I get nervous, sweaty, I freak out. I'm a very shy person, so it's really embarrassing. I'll stumble over words, read or speak really fast.

I pretty much have an anxiety attack. Hell, I hate being in a big crowd full of people I don't know.
 
#6
I like small conversations a lot (like up to 4,5 people), and I like speaking in front of a big group. I don't like when a big group is having a conversation. |:

But yeah, I have absolutely no problem with public speaking unless you like, threw me out there to talk about something I don't know. And my main problem with that is I obviously wouldn't be capable of discussing the topic.
 

Merc

Certified Shitlord
V.I.P.
#8
I know it's true because I find myself very comfortable talking in front of my Sociology classes but not so much in my Children's lit class.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
#9
I used to get nervous before presentations for school, but I never freaked out about it or anything. I'm just not a great speaker. The smaller the group, the more comfortable I am.
 

Kazmarov

For a Free Scotland
#10
I'm more comfortable in small groups because then people actually are going to fully listen to you and then probably respond. For example at an Obama office meeting I addressed the media sub-group, which was about 10-12 people and gave a couple important extemporaneous speeches.

Doing it in front of a big crowd just seems to not pay off much to me, besides providing me with undue criticism in some cases or irrelevant praise in others. Much rather have all the people in a group I address have the chance to address me as an equal face-to-face.