Public (figures) Apologies

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#1
I saw an article about Tiger Woods and his recent apology in the lines of "I was unfaithful. I had affairs. I cheated. What I did was not acceptable,"...

I don't get it. Why does he feel he needed to apologise to the public? Why does the public feel they're entitled to an apology?

It's the same question I have in mind when Bill Clinton had to apologise for his blowjob (and not just lying under oath).

Is it because they're idolised? And they've disappointed fans? If that's so, should every celebrity with a faux pas (remember Britney Spears and her parenting failures) need to publicly apologise for that? Or should Brad Pitt apologise to the public for being with Angelina Jolie? Or is this whole apology thing only applicable to sex scandals?
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
#2
I think Tiger truly felt sorry for letting down his family, friends, and fans. He didn't have to apologize. He wanted to. I think it was more than just trying to clean up his image. Most public apologies from celebrities are damage control and not because they feel they owe it to anyone.
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
#3
When you are a celebrity, you feel like you're an idol. People see you as an idol and you feel like you should be a good example to them.
If you ruin your image it means you're not as good as you appear to be, you're not a good example to follow and you feel the need to apologize for disappointing the ones who believed in you.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#4
Damage control...ok that makes sense. It somehow means that some fans are willing to let you go unless you appease them, even if they're fans for your talents that have nothing to do with what you're apologising for. I mean, say I'm a fan of Plushenko for his figure skating skills. If one day I find out he was cheating on his wife, that wouldn't make me less of a fan. I cannot imagine getting myself distraught over something that happens in his private life that has nothing to do with skating.
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
#5
It depends on the celebrity figure you're trying to reveal.
You can't compare a president to a tennis or golf player.

A president is what represents [among many things] also the morals of a country.
If you talk to me about morals and one day you go and cheat on your wife, you'd have to apologize or resign because you were trying to teach me something you can't handle for yourself.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#6
But there's no difference much between what happened with Woods and public officials- they both made the same public apology for their affairs.

Even then, I never look at public officials to teach me morals. I think govt shouldn't meddle with what happens in my bedroom or my spiritual beliefs, and I give them the same treatment. I don't care who the public officials are sleeping with nor if they go to church or not.
 

oxyMORON

A Darker Knight
#7
Celebrities are just like us. If we cheated and whatnot, nobody would care (except for the people directly involved, obviously). I think public figures apologize because once they get under the scope of the public eye, they have to uphold this moral standard.

Everyone has different standards, but I think public figures have a tighter set of rules they have to follow, but don't necessarily always agree with. Clinton might've thought a blowjob wasn't cheating, but under the rules of the general public, it was.

So I think whenever a celebrity apologizes, there's that occasional honest apology. More often than not it's more about letting the general public know that they are aware of what is expected of them.