Presidential Debate # 2

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#1
So tonight is the second presidential debate and it seems that the campaign is getting more "bitter".

So who will be watching this debate and what are your expectations? :popcorn:


Race turns bitter as debate looms

The US presidential candidates have exchanged barbs as they prepare for a crucial debate on Tuesday evening.

Barack Obama accused John McCain of "smear tactics" and said he was not paying enough attention to the economic crisis that has been gripping the US.

John McCain said Mr Obama was "lying" about his ties to the home loan industry and asked what his rival had ever accomplished in government.
The campaign tone has turned nasty as polls show Mr Obama widening his lead.

Polling numbers

The latest Gallup daily tracking poll puts Senator Obama at 50% and Senator McCain at 42%, while a new CNN poll put Mr Obama ahead by 53% to 45%.

Mr Obama, the Democratic candidate, is still gaining in some of the key swing states as well. A new Washington Post poll puts him 6% ahead of Mr McCain in Ohio, a state the Republican candidate must take if he is to win the presidency.

The poll also showed that the Obama camp had a stronger organisation on the ground, with 43% of potential voters having been contacted by Democratic supporters, while only 33% had heard from McCain supporters.
With voter registration having closed in many key states on Monday, the evidence suggests that the majority of the four million new voters added to the electoral roles are registering as Democrats - for example, in Florida, it is by a two to one majority.

Town Hall debate

The second presidential debate is generating intense interest among the public.

More than six million people have e-mailed questions to the moderator, NBC news presenter Tom Brokaw, who will preside over the town hall-style debate in Nashville, Tennessee.

He will select only six or seven e-mailed questions, as well as about a dozen from the studio audience of 80 uncommitted voters.

Mr McCain, who is widely viewed as having lost the first debate, has vowed to take the gloves off for this encounter. Mr Obama, meanwhile, promised to fight back. "We don't throw the first punch, but we'll throw the last," he told a syndicated radio show.

Fresh accusations

In recent days both camps have launched fresh accusations questioning the character of their opponent. Mr McCain's running mate Sarah Palin posed further questions about Mr Obama's "truthfulness and judgement." Governor Palin had accused Mr Obama of "palling around" with a "domestic terrorist" - Bill Ayers.

Mr Ayers belonged to the US militant group Weather Underground, which opposed the Vietnam War in the 1960s. Mr Obama once served on a charity board with Mr Ayers but has denounced his radical past.

In an interview with the New York Times newspaper on Monday, Mrs Palin also suggested that voters should pay more attention to Mr Obama's relationship with his former church pastor, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright. "I don't know why that association isn't discussed more, because those were appalling things that that pastor had said about our great country," she said.

Mr McCain had previously indicated that he did not want Rev Wright's inflammatory sermons, which Mr Obama has repudiated, to form part of his campaign.

Judgement claim

Meanwhile, the Obama campaign has been highlighting Mr McCain's involvement in a financial scandal 20 years ago.

It e-mailed supporters an internet video about Mr McCain's connections to Arizona tycoon Charles Keating, who was convicted of securities fraud after his savings and loan bank collapsed.

Mr McCain was one of five senators - known as the Keating Five - to be investigated by a Senate ethics panel over their intervention with banking regulators on behalf of Keating.

He was found to be less involved with Keating than the other senators but was criticised for "poor judgement". Mr McCain has himself described the affair as "the worst mistake of my life", and one which led him to sponsor legislation on campaign finance reform.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
#4
Mr McCain, who is widely viewed as having lost the first debate, has vowed to take the gloves off for this encounter. Mr Obama, meanwhile, promised to fight back. "We don't throw the first punch, but we'll throw the last," he told a syndicated radio show.
yeah baby - Should be more exciting than the last debate.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#6
I'll watch the highlights when they come out online, like they did with the other debates.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
#7
This debate tonight and the rest of the election reminds me of Rock Balboa (Rocky VI). McCain is like Rocky. The old guy, former hero and champion. Been at the game a long time with some wins, some losses. Obama is Mason Dixon, the young guy, often a little too cocky, relatively untested but very talented....
...well, I was going to tell how the movie ended, but there may be someone who hasn't seen it and I would hate to spoil it. Good movie.
Anyway, not meant to be biased, just a fun way to view to 2 candidates. If you've seen the movie, I think you'll agree you can make a parallel between art and life.
------
====================================================
EDIT
I shoulda asked this question a lot sooner. But, since this is a townhall style debate, what is the one question you would ask both candidates if you could?

I know most of their policy, so for me it would be:
What is your opinion of the two border guards, Ramos and Compean that are serving 10+ years in solitary confinement for shooting at an illegal immigrant that was smuggling drugs into the country and would you consider giving them a pardon?

(If you only get 1 question, you gotta make it a long one)
 
Last edited:

Swiftstrike

Registered Member
#8
I am watching the debate right now. Before the analyst tear it apart I would like to give my opinion thusfar.

It appears Obama came off confident and bulleted his points. He spoke vaguely on some issues but in general did great job of conveying his points. He lost some steam in the end.

McCain did not come off as eloquent, he was a bit more straightforward. However, I think he really didn't impress me. McCain needed a definite win and he didn't get it.


Both candidates spent too much time "correcting" each other as oppose to answering the questions.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
#9
A good drinking game would have been to take a shot every time McCain says "my friend(s)".
 

Tucker

Lion Rampant
#10
McCain is like Rocky.
That's slightly less bizarre than your comparison of Sarah Palin to Ronald Reagan, which smacked heavily of a certain Quayle/Kennedy moment from a certain Vice Presidential debate of some years ago. No offense to you, MIT, but Palin is no Great Communicator and, according to a new poll, doesn't even have the popularity of a Hillary Clinton. At least I can sort of make out a rough justification for the analogy in the case of Balboa/McCain.

EDIT
I shoulda asked this question a lot sooner. But, since this is a townhall style debate, what is the one question you would ask both candidates if you could?
I'm glad you brought this up. My question would have been, "Has there been anything that your campaign advisers have suggested, in the way of strategy, to which you found yourself morally opposed?" Their responses could have been quite revealing. I do hope somebody gets that one off in Part III.

McCain needed a definite win and he didn't get it.
That's my bottom line assessment of this round. I scored it, more or less, as a draw (unless you take a point away from McCain for wandering in front of Brokaw's teleprompter, lol) -- and a close showing favors the front runner. I don't predict that this night's activities at Generic U. will have any noticeable effect on the polls.

A good drinking game would have been to take a shot every time McCain says "my friend(s)".
Not unless you want alcohol poisoning. Dude used that 'faux-ksy' expression no fewer than 22 times in 90 minutes. Does that creepy, repetitious attempt at simulating human warmth actually endear him to anyone, I wonder?

My overall impression of PresDeb II: it's a well-known phenomenon in the latter stages of a political campaign; the candidates both tend to gravitate toward the center (in fact, I created a fake movie poster on that very theme). I saw a lot of that effect tonight; in fact, the similarities between the two seemed to overshadow their differences. Hell, McCain even acknowledged agreement with Obama in two distinct areas!

If I had to fault Obama for something, it would be his comment, "You know, a lot of you remember the tragedy of 9/11 and where you were on that day..." which he used as a preface in answering a participant's question on personal sacrifices that may have to be made during the next administration. (A lot of us, Senator? Try everyone older than twelve.) He's probably lying in bed right now, kicking himself under the sheets for that one.

Conversely, my major gripe with McCain's performance (apart from his lying through his dentures, which I've learned to expect) came when he contemptuously spat out a reference to Obama as "that one." What the hell?! Meowrr! Hating much? The more I see of McCain, the more he plays into my mind's caricature of the bitter old guy in suspenders who won't let kids play on his lawn. "Why, those darn little... Hey! Hey, you punks! Stay off-a my property, all-a ya, or by jingo I'll be callin' the cops next!"

Anyway, I was grateful that we didn't have to hear the word "maverick" beaten into the ground this time around. That was a refreshing change we can believe in, no?
 
Last edited: