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Personal Finance/ Budgeting Software

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
Now that I've moved out of home and living in an apartment I have more bills etc to worry about than I ever have before. I'm interested in getting some form of budgeting/ personal finance software to keep track of it all. I've had a bit of a search around but there are just so many different types and it's a bit overwhelming.

I basically want something that's user friendly and not too complicated since I only want to use it for basic budgeting functions etc. I would also prefer something that isn't too expensive or free, and available on Macs.

Does anyone have any recommendations or has used software like this before?
 

Vidic15

No Custom Title Exists
V.I.P.
It would be easier to hand write it because with technology, you can easily get lost and flustered.
 

Crouton

Ninja
V.I.P.
Hmm, I have been thinking of just handwriting it. I live near an Officeworks so I might go look at the type of ledgers they have.
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
Well the obvious software is a simple spreadsheet creator. Something like MS Office's Excel or OpenOffice's Math. Something I've used in the past is a free accounting program called GnuCash. Alternatively, you could just get hold of a couple of books and get to grips with doing double-entry bookkeeping by hand.
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
I'm sure someone smarter than me can properly explain what double-entry bookkeeping is, but from my basic understanding, it's where all transactions (outgoing and incoming) are recorded at least twice in at least two different ledgers. It's basically a way of lowering the chance of errors, and I'm fairly certain most accounting software uses it.
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As an example, let's say you have two books, with one labelled Assets, and one labelled Liabilities/Expenses. And lets say you've just paid rent. What you'd do is record the rent paid in the Assets book as a deduction, and then record it in the Liabilities/Expenses book as a increase. When you then tally up the total for both books, the two should be equal.
 
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CaptainObvious

Embrace the Suck
V.I.P.
I'm sure someone smarter than me can properly explain what double-entry bookkeeping is, but from my basic understanding, it's where all transactions (outgoing and incoming) are recorded at least twice in at least two different ledgers. It's basically a way of lowering the chance of errors, and I'm fairly certain most accounting software uses it.
------
As an example, let's say you have two books, with one labelled Assets, and one labelled Liabilities/Expenses. And lets say you've just paid rent. What you'd do is record the rent paid in the Assets book as a deduction, and then record it in the Liabilities/Expenses book as a increase. When you then tally up the total for both books, the two should be equal.
Or what you have is a ledger called rent and a ledger called liabilities. You enter it in both, to keep track of all expenses over a period of time, and you have a ledger to show how much you paid in rent over a period of time.

I handwrite my budget. I make a monthly budget and a budget for every two weeks. It's easier and more efficient than any software program, in my opinion.
 
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