Past Participle

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
#11
Edit: It's not uncommon for people who have learnt a foreign language (and not native) to be better at knowing specific terms for the grammar rules etc.
I think the reason for this is because native speakers eventually start to just use casual language and don't completely focus on how they're meant to speak. Anyone learning a foreign language don't (initially) learn how to speak casually, they learn formal. Hence being better at being formal.
 
#12
I think the reason for this is because native speakers eventually start to just use casual language and don't completely focus on how they're meant to speak. Anyone learning a foreign language don't (initially) learn how to speak casually, they learn formal. Hence being better at being formal.
Yeop, that's exactly what I meant. I half-remember it being discussed in a thread once. God knows where, though.
 

Smelnick

Creeping On You
V.I.P.
#13
When they teach us grammar in school, they don't necessarily teach about participles. I only know the word because I've seen it used in my Spanish class in university.

They did teach us to use drank and drunk properly in the appropriate situations, but they didn't do it using that term. Mostly because you get taught that in grade 2 or 3, and so participle wouldn't be part of our vocabulary. However, if you're learning a language at an older age, you'd of course learn that term.
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
#14
I think the reason for this is because native speakers eventually start to just use casual language and don't completely focus on how they're meant to speak. Anyone learning a foreign language don't (initially) learn how to speak casually, they learn formal. Hence being better at being formal.
Yeah, that's true.
This could be the reason.
 

Cotjav

Registered Member
#15
dont hear a lot about past participles when you get taught english because for many its a first language, so the complexities are just assumed, and i dont know of any school that teaches english using verb tables etc like you get when learning a foreign language.

i studied french and german. past participles come up a lot when learning those languages as for many it will be learned as a second language and therefore learned from scratch, with a definite structure.

english grammar is a weird thing anyway so it would be near impossible to teach with structure without having to clarify exceptions to nearly every rule.

and dont get me started on how we need 2 versions of pasts for the verb hang, why not just one?
 
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