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Past Participle

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
In one of the threads here, I found this sentence that to me is grammatically incorrect.

If we drunk ground coffee a lot, I could justify buying a grinder for that.
The verb drunk is actually in past participle and not in the simple past tense.
In the conditional sentence we have here, I think the simple past of the verb "drink" would be more correct.

So, I think it goes like "If we drank coffee, I could justify ... ".

A few posters here [one native British and the other native American] said they didn't know what past participle is.
:shifteyes:

What am I missing here? Howcome they didn't know it?
Maybe I'm incorrect?


p.s. for those who are not familiar with P.Part.
Participle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
As I said, I was never taught it in my school. This may or may not be attributed to the fact that I never went to a private school.
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
Storm, this is not about you personally. I just wanted to clarify if I'm wrong about what I know and what is grammatically correct in that sentence. :)

It helps us both.
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
[one native British and the other native American] :shifteyes:
Are you referring to me as the other person? You know I am not native American right? :shake:

And just so we clear, I am aware that "drank" should have been used in that sentence, but I have not heard of the term past participle... :shifteyes:
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
Storm, this is not about you personally. I just wanted to clarify if I'm wrong about what I know and what is grammatically correct in that sentence. :)

It helps us both.
I was only answering the part where you ask "how come they didn't know it?"

Can't exactly get offended or blame myself when I wasn't taught it, can I?
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
:lol: sorry CG ... for a moment I forgot you are from South Africa. ... but it doesn't really matter who the persons were ... really ...

Though I find it strange that none of you has heard about that term haha ...
 

idisrsly

I'm serious
V.I.P.
:lol: sorry CG ... for a moment I forgot you are from South Africa. ... but it doesn't really matter who the persons were ... really ...

Though I find it strange that none of you has heard about that term haha ...
Don't make that mistake again... :lol:

I even Wiki'd that term after I saw you used it and I can categorically state that I was not taught that term in school either. I wonder what the term is in Afrikaans?? Mmmm
 

EllyDicious

made of AMBIGUITY
V.I.P.
Can't exactly get offended or blame myself when I wasn't taught it, can I?
No you can't blame yourself. It's just strange because using simple past in that sentence is a basic rule for that type of conditional.

or maybe in British you have a slightly-different grammatical rule??
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit

Rebeccaaa

yellow 4!
I knew there was a difference, but I'm also pretty sure I've never heard that term before. I don't really recognise it, like Storm, never got taught it in school.


Edit: It's not uncommon for people who have learnt a foreign language (and not native) to be better at knowing specific terms for the grammar rules etc.
 
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