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no Buddha image here

Tucker

Lion Rampant
Sid G. was no deity but a very real dude from Nepal, if "very real dude" can be said of an actual prince. According to surviving biographies, Sid pissed away the first part of his life, first as a spoiled and indolent do-nothing and then as a pious, flesh-denying fakir.

One day, as he sat contemplative and motionless under a tree, living only as a mind (and close to starvation death from a rigid refusal to eat), Siddhartha Gautama had a revelation that would change the world forever - and it came from without. A young maiden walking by him on a food errand glanced at the skeletal figure sitting on the ground and decided to stop. "What is wrong with you?" she chided. "Why do you not eat?"

The man who would one day be known by billions as The Buddha (a once-common word meaning 'enlightened one') blinked with surprise. He looked at the kind face and at the big bowl of rice being offered him. Then he shook his head. "I do not know, human! LOL!"

Gautama filled his belly and left his solitary perch, vowing as the strength began returning to his limbs that no more would he be a lump.

I like this "Eureka!" story, which may contain more historical fact than not. It's nice to know, at least, that it could happen.



And this fat guy? It's not Gautama. This familiar figure represents Ho-Tai, nicknamed "Laughing Buddha," a freakishly happy Chinese monk who lived hundreds of years later. I was an adult, or close to it, before my Western mind could separate the two men out. And still I thought Ho-Tai was a traditional god of myth until doing the fact checking for this thread. Do you confuse the two? After seeing Ho-Tai instead of Gautama in a Simpsons scene about "Buddha," I'm thinking it must be a widespread misconception.
 

Dekzper

Registered Member
I'm western (Scottish mostly) but I've known the diff since I was little. Mostly cause I've been raised Buddhist. The bowl is known as the begging bowl that monks use to gather food in the mornings. But I def like Maitreya Buddha (laughing Buddha) since he liked young people. I dont believe in the gods anymore but I do believe in reincarnation so maybe he's still around. Hmmm...
 
if anyone who is interested in this has netflix they have a watch instantly documentary called "the Buddha" which tells the story a little differently with historians.

I like the story because it has been proven and is the true story of a real man reaching enlightenment (he had not been a prince for many many years when it happened for he had spent 2/3 of his life searching for meaning after having left his wife and young son)

His story of course is not to be confused with the best selling classic called Siddhartha, which is instead a work of fiction about a young man of the same name who follows a similar journey to "The Buddha." oh and it should be noted that to this day others can be called a Buddha, if only they can reach enlightenment.
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
if anyone who is interested in this has netflix they have a watch instantly documentary called "the Buddha" which tells the story a little differently with historians.

I like the story because it has been proven and is the true story of a real man reaching enlightenment (he had not been a prince for many many years when it happened for he had spent 2/3 of his life searching for meaning after having left his wife and young son)

His story of course is not to be confused with the best selling classic called Siddhartha, which is instead a work of fiction about a young man of the same name who follows a similar journey to "The Buddha." oh and it should be noted that to this day others can be called a Buddha, if only they can reach enlightenment.
Was this the one that was narrated by Richard Gere? I was actually going to mention it in this thread, if so! It was an interesting watch. :nod:

For the record, I am Catholic, but I find that Buddhism is one of those faith bases that has a lot of philosophy that's beneficial for everyone who might read about it.
 
Was this the one that was narrated by Richard Gere? I was actually going to mention it in this thread, if so! It was an interesting watch. :nod:

For the record, I am Catholic, but I find that Buddhism is one of those faith bases that has a lot of philosophy that's beneficial for everyone who might read about it.
yeah thats the one, it also has the dalai llama lol it was a pbs special i believe.

i think that Buddhism does not replace another religion but instead should be used as a way to live a meaningful and happy life and when partnered with another religion, like Christianity or Catholicism, can lead to further religious immersion.
 

Dekzper

Registered Member
yeah thats the one, it also has the dalai llama lol it was a pbs special i believe.

i think that Buddhism does not replace another religion but instead should be used as a way to live a meaningful and happy life and when partnered with another religion, like Christianity or Catholicism, can lead to further religious immersion.
You're def right about 2 points. :nod:
1. Anyone can be a Buddha cause any totally enlightened person is who we seek guidance from. I mean, anyone who is totally enlightened will have the same answers that we need.
2. Buddhism is not a religion. It's a discipline. And even though I def would never wanna be a monk (no way), my mind is still trained to think very clearly about things. I mean, I dont really care if I dont reach enlightenment but I do hope I dont come back as a skunk.
There are still a lot of Buddhists though that believe in the guardian gods and wont eat banana leaves but I think those are just lessons too that should not be used literally.
 

Tucker

Lion Rampant
Buddhism can be a discipline or a religion, depending on which flavor you're talking about and how far you take it. For some, offering prayers and making ritual temple visits are a large part of the process of self-discovery. Others, Westerners in particular, may look for the essence of Buddhist wisdom to incorporate into their lives, ignoring metaphysical aspects such as reincarnation.

Remember the ancient Zen proverb: "If you see The Buddha on the road, kill him." :)
 
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