NHL Officially Implements "Blindside Rule": 5 Minute Major + Ejection

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#2
oh joy... another rule for Crosby to dive for.

Dont get me wrong, I'm not saying intentional blindside hits are ever welcome. But as All the greats have said in their Memoirs and interviews.... Keep your Damn Heads up and this wouldnt be an issue.

Phil Esposito pretty much attributed Eric Lindros' short career to his inability to keep his head up and his lust for playing in the corners.

The rule isnt bad... I'm just not excited to see yet another rule implemented that favors the "family friendly".
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
#3
I agree, one of the major reasons why players get blindsided is because players don't keep their heads up.

But on the other hand, players like Matt Cooke will throw out their elbows and give Savard a concussion. So it works both ways which is why I do like the new rule. That's just one example of many from just last season.
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#4
But on the other hand, players like Matt Cooke will throw out their elbows and give Savard a concussion. So it works both ways which is why I do like the new rule. That's just one example of many from just last season.
I feel ya, I really do... but follow me for a second and maybe you'll see where I'm coming from. I'm not defending the Matt Cookes or the Marty McSorleys or the other hacks in the game who are lucky to log 5 minutes of ice time a month.

But if Savard is Elbowed by Cooke.... then wheres the "Elbowing" call?

46.1 Elbowing - Elbowing shall mean the use of an extended elbow in a manner that may or may not cause injury.

46.2 Minor Penalty - The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a minor penalty, based on the degree of violence, to a player or goalkeeper guilty of elbowing an opponent.

46.3 Major Penalty - A major penalty, at the discretion of the Referee, shall be imposed on any player or goalkeeper who uses his elbow to foul an opponent. A major penalty must be imposed under this rule for a foul resulting in an injury to the face or head of an opponent (see 46.5).

46.4 Match Penalty - The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a match penalty if, in his judgment, the player or goalkeeper attempted to or deliberately injured his opponent by elbowing.

46.5 Game Misconduct Penalty - When a major penalty is imposed under this rule for a foul resulting in an injury to the face or head of an opponent, a game misconduct penalty shall also be imposed.

46.6 Fines and Suspensions - When a major penalty and a game misconduct is assessed for a foul resulting in an injury to the face or head of an opponent, an automatic fine of one hundred dollars ($100) shall be imposed.

If deemed appropriate, supplementary discipline can be applied by the Commissioner at his discretion (refer to Rule 29).

Official Rules - Rule 46: Elbowing - NHL.com - Rules
or if Cooke did it against the Boards... wheres the Boarding Call?

42.1 Boarding – A boarding penalty shall be imposed on any player or goalkeeper who checks an opponent in such a manner that causes the opponent to be thrown violently in the boards. The severity of the penalty, based upon the degree of violence of the impact with the boards, shall be at the discretion of the Referee.

There is an enormous amount of judgment involved in the application of this rule by the Referees. The onus is on the player (or goalkeeper) applying the check to ensure his opponent is not in a vulnerable position and if so, he must avoid the contact. However, there is also a responsibility on the player with the puck to avoid placing himself in a dangerous and vulnerable position. This balance must be considered by the Referees when applying this rule.

Any unnecessary contact with a player playing the puck on an obvious “icing” or “off-side” play which results in that player being knocked into the boards is “boarding” and must be penalized as such. In other instances where there is no contact with the boards, it should be treated as “charging.”

42.2 Minor Penalty – The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a minor penalty, based on the degree of violence of the impact with the boards, to a player or goalkeeper guilty of boarding an opponent.

42.3 Major Penalty – The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a major penalty, based on the degree of violence of the impact with the boards, to a player or goalkeeper guilty of boarding an opponent (see 42.5).

42.4 Match Penalty – The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a match penalty if, in his judgment, the player or goalkeeper attempted to or deliberately injured his opponent by boarding.

42.5 Game Misconduct Penalty - When a major penalty is imposed under this rule for a foul resulting in an injury to the face or head of an opponent, a game misconduct shall be imposed.

42.6 Fines and Suspensions - Any player or goalkeeper who incurs a total of two (2) game misconducts under Rule 42 and/or Rule 44, in either Regular season or Play-offs, shall be suspended automatically for the next game of his team. For each subsequent game misconduct penalty the automatic suspension shall be increased by one game.

When a major penalty is imposed under this rule, an automatic fine of one hundred dollars ($100) shall be imposed.

If deemed appropriate, supplementary discipline can be applied by the Commissioner at his discretion (refer to Rule 29).

Official Rules - Rule 42: Boarding - NHL.com - Rules
or maybe it was behind him?

44.1 Checking from Behind – A check from behind is a check delivered on a player who is not aware of the impending hit, therefore unable to protect or defend himself, and contact is made on the back part of the body. When a player intentionally turns his body to create contact with his back, no penalty shall be assessed.

44.2 Minor Penalty - There is no provision for a minor penalty for checking from behind.

44.3 Major Penalty – Any player or goalkeeper who cross-checks, pushes or charges from behind an opponent who is unable to protect or defend himself, shall be assessed a major penalty. This penalty applies anywhere on the playing surface (see 44.5).

44.4 Match Penalty - The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a match penalty if, in his judgment, the player or goalkeeper attempted to or deliberately injured his opponent by checking from behind.

44.5 Game Misconduct – A game misconduct penalty must be assessed anytime a major penalty is applied for checking from behind.

44.6 Fines and Suspensions - Any player or goalkeeper who incurs a total of two (2) game misconducts under Rule 42 and/or Rule 44, in either theRegular season or Play-offs, shall be suspended automatically for the next game of his team. For each subsequent game misconduct penalty the automatic suspension shall be increased by one game.

If deemed appropriate, supplementary discipline can be applied by the Commissioner at his discretion (refer to Rule 29).

Official Rules - Rule 44: Checking from Behind - NHL.com - Rules
Was Savard in control of the Puck at the time or was this an off the wall act of malicious violence... wheres the interference call?

56.1 Interference - A strict standard on acts of interference must be adhered to in all areas of the rink.

Body Position: Body position shall be determined as the player skating in front of or beside his opponent, traveling in the same direction. A player who is behind an opponent, who does not have the puck, may not use his stick, body or free hand in order to restrain his opponent, but must skate in order to gain or reestablish his proper position in order to make a check.

A player is allowed the ice he is standing on (body position) and is not required to move in order to let an opponent proceed. A player may “block” the path of an opponent provided he is in front of his opponent and moving in the same direction. Moving laterally and without establishing body position, then making contact with the non-puck carrier is not permitted and will be penalized as interference. A player is always entitled to use his body position to lengthen an opponent’s path to the puck, provided his stick is not utilized (to make himself “bigger” and therefore considerably lengthening the distance his opponent must travel to get where he is going); his free hand is not used and he does not take advantage of his body position to deliver an otherwise illegal check.

Possession of the Puck:

The last player to touch the puck, other than the goalkeeper, shall be considered the player in possession. The player deemed in possession of the puck may be checked legally, provided the check is rendered immediately following his loss of possession.

Restrain: The actions of a player or goalkeeper who does not have body position, but instead uses illegal means (e.g. hook with stick; hold with hands, trip with the stick or in any manner) to impede an opponent who is not in possession of the puck. Illegal means are acts which allow a player or goalkeeper to establish, maintain or restore body position other than by skating.

Pick: A “pick” is the action of a player or goalkeeper who checks an opponent who is not in possession of the puck and is unaware of the impending check/hit. A player who is aware of an impending hit, not deemed to be a legal “battle for the puck,” may not be interfered with by a player or goalkeeper delivering a “pick.” A player or goalkeeper delivering a “pick” is one who moves into an opponent’s path without initially having body position, thereby taking him out of the play. When this is done, an interference penalty shall be assessed.

Free Hand: When a free hand is used to hold, pull, tug, grab or physically restrain an opponent from moving freely, this must be penalized as holding. The free hand may be used by a player to “fend off” an opponent or his stick, but may not be used to hold an opponent’s stick or body.

Stick: A player or goalkeeper who does not have body position on his opponent, who uses his stick (either the blade or the shaft, including the butt-end of the shaft) to impede or prevent his opponent from moving freely on the ice shall be assessed a hooking penalty.

56.2 Minor Penalty - A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player or goalkeeper who interferes with or impedes the progress of an opponent who is not in possession of the puck.

A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player or goalkeeper who restrains an opponent who is attempting to “fore-check.”

A minor penalty shall be imposed on an attacking player who deliberately checks a defensive player, including the goalkeeper, who is not in possession of the puck.

A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player who shall cause an opponent who is not in possession of the puck to be forced off-side, causing a stoppage in play. If this action causes a delayed off-side (and not necessarily a stoppage in play), then the application of a penalty for interference is subject to the judgment of the Referee.

A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player who deliberately knocks a stick out of an opponent’s hand, or who prevents a player who has dropped his stick or any other piece of equipment from regaining possession of it.

A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player who knocks or shoots any abandoned or broken stick or illegal puck or other debris towards an opposing puck carrier in a manner that could cause him to be distracted. (See also Rule 53 – Throwing Equipment.)

A minor penalty shall be imposed on any identifiable player on the players’ bench or penalty bench who, by means of his stick or his body, interferes with the movements of the puck or any opponent on the ice during the progress of the play. In addition, should a player about to come onto the ice, play the puck while one or both skates are still on the players’ or penalty bench, a minor penalty for interference shall be assessed.

The appropriate penalty according to the playing rules shall be assessed when a player on the players’ or penalty bench gets involved with an opponent on the ice during a stoppage in play. The player(s) involved may be subject to additional sanctions as appropriate pursuant to Rule 29 – Supplementary Discipline.

56.4 Major Penalty - The Referee, at his discretion, may assess a major penalty, based on the degree of violence, to a player or goalkeeper guilty of interfering with an opponent (see 56.5).

56.5 Game Misconduct Penalty – When a major penalty is imposed under this rule for a foul resulting in an injury of an opponent, a game misconduct shall be imposed.

Official Rules - Rule 56: Interference - NHL.com - Rules
or Roughing?

51.1 Roughing – Roughing is a punching motion with the hand or fist, with or without the glove on the hand, normally directed at the head or face of an opponent.

Roughing is a minor altercation that is not worthy of a major penalty to either participant. (An altercation is a situation involving two players, including goalkeepers, with at least one to be penalized).

51.2 Minor Penalty - A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player or goalkeeper who strikes an opponent with his hand or fist.

51.3 Match Penalty - If, in the judgment of the Referee, a goalkeeper uses his blocking glove to punch an opponent in the head or face in an attempt to or to deliberately injure an opponent, a match penalty must be assessed.

51.4 Fines and Suspensions - There are no specified fines or suspensions for roughing, however, supplementary discipline can be applied by the Commissioner at his discretion (refer to Rule 29).

Official Rules - Rule 51: Roughing - NHL.com - Rules
The issue I have is that's what.... 5 penalties that I can think of and relate to a malicious elbowing incident in a matter of maybe 3 seconds. Every single one of them escalates from 2 minutes to 5 minutes to Game Misconduct to fine / penalty. Why cant the officials use the damn rules that we already have?

We wouldn't need a new rule every time Avery wiggles his stick, or Pronger does whatever Pronger does, or any other Hack for that matter ruffles some Soccer Moms feathers by playing an aggressive style of hockey.... if the officials would just regulate the game by the disgustingly large rule book they already have... we wouldn't need these addenda every time a scorer gets pancaked.

Am I missing something? I mean this is what I believe is wrong with Bettman era NHL. The addition to the rule books have been nasty, Hockey is a very simple sport. Yet if you asked any random person on the street what "icing" was in hockey I bet you they'd have no clue. Why? Because they see all these moving parts, icing, 2-line pass*, offsides, delay of game, Power Play, Penalty Kill, Oh Noes to many things going on. But in reality its not... The Bettman era however IS making it complicated. Growing up as a child of the 80's and playing in the 90's, Hockey was like life... Do onto others as you want done to you. Back in those days if a Cooke nailed a Savard out of line... a Scott "Sheriff" Parker would set that Cooke straight..... In Bettmans NHL, now the Sheriff is just as evil as Cooke and gets a 3rd man in plus an immediate suspension. I want hockey to be played like it was meant to be played, with Flow, with Aggression, with Emotion. There are too many rules now punishing every damn action that made the game great. if you asked me what I believe the NHL Front office should do... I say scrap the whole damn NHL Rule book and start taking notes;

YouTube - Slapshot


it just disgusts me... lol I'll stop there,

*ps... i threw that in there to see if you were paying attention
 
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