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Most ground turkey has poop in it.

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Thought you would like to know this. I think its gross and never did eat ground turkey but I'm wondering if this includes turkey sandwich meat. They found a couple of different types of bacteria that is associated with poop which included antibiotic resistant bacteria too.

Lab tests: Most ground turkey has poop in it | The Raw Story
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
One more reason to buy your meat from a local farmer whose farming practices are transparent
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I think turkey sandwich meat does include ground turkey (it's sort of pressed back together).

I don't think this is a big deal, there's a lot of stuff in your food that's in very small quantities.

A few that I know off the top of my head.

Orange Juice usually has pork fat in it (ever wonder why it's so thick?)
Chocolate milk often has blood in it (I mix my own because of this, though there are many that question it)
There's a certain amount of rat hair that's allowed in peanut butter. (that's pretty nasty)
 
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Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
not a big deal until you get sick with an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection.

and why is the bacteria resistant to antibiotics? Because the cows and turkeys on factory farms are given sub-therapeutic antibiotics because factory farms are so filthy and the animals are housed in unsanitary conditions.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
I'm a little skeptical about this. Not because I distrust Consumer Reports' results (who did the study), but because of how often stuff like this gets blown out of proportion - and the fact that I'm not sure CR knows how to analyze the results properly.

For instance, a HuffPo article about this (Ground Turkey Study Finds More Than Half Of Samples Contaminated With Fecal Bacteria) says

In addition to evidence associated with fecal contamination, Consumer Reports also found that many of the disease-causing organisms it tested were resistant to antibiotics used to fight them. Consumer Reports tested both conventional turkey meat and turkey meat from birds that were not fed antibiotics. Conventional ground turkey was compared to ground turkey labeled “no antibiotics,” “organic,” (which doesn't use antibiotics) or “raised without antibiotics” -- and all were found to be equally likely to contain the bacteria the magazine included in its study. However, bacteria on the antibiotic-free ground turkey was less likely to be antibiotic-resistant.
So the fact that it's antibiotic resistant may be of concern, but that seems like much less of a concern than one might have initially thought. But then you have to realize that there's bacteria in everything, and some of them are actually beneficial. Obviously, some of the ones they found are harmful, but in what concentration?

Also, dDave - the thing about blood in chocolate milk is a myth snopes.com: Cow Blood in Chocolate Milk. Also, if you think about it, it really doesn't make sense that they would be allowed to do that

Vegans also frequently claim that there's blood and pus in all cow's milk, which is also completely misleading. Cow's milk (just like human breast milk) contains white cells that are useful in helping the baby's immune system develop. Vegans often claim throw around the term "somatic cells", but somatic cells are "any biological cell forming the body of an organism; that is, in a multicellular organism, any cell other than a gamete, germ cell, gametocyte or undifferentiated stem cell.[1]" Somatic cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
I refuse to eat ground poultry. It seems very gross to me. I've gotten to the point where I don't eat lunch meat either.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Some lunch meat and hot dogs have ground turkey in it. After reading this I don't want anything to do with it and I never buy hotdogs that aren't 100% beef.

If you eat turkey that has the antibiotic resistant bacteria in it and you get sick will antibiotics even help you.
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
It's not just vegans who claim that cow's milk has pus in it. But rather than argue the semantics of pus vs. somatic cells vs. white blood cells, let's talk about the fact that whatever is in milk that shouldn't be is due to the fact that dairy cows produce something in the neighborhood of 3 - 4 times the milk that cows actually should produce (because they are given growth hormones) and as a result suffer from mastitis at a very high rate. This is a very painful infection, and the cows are usually put back in the production line before the infection is completely cleared up (in order to produce more milk and make more money). So whether the cells in milk technically constitute pus, doesn't it bother you that they are cells that are produced by infection?
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
It's not just vegans who claim that cow's milk has pus in it. But rather than argue the semantics of pus vs. somatic cells vs. white blood cells, let's talk about the fact that whatever is in milk that shouldn't be is due to the fact that dairy cows produce something in the neighborhood of 3 - 4 times the milk that cows actually should produce (because they are given growth hormones) and as a result suffer from mastitis at a very high rate. This is a very painful infection, and the cows are usually put back in the production line before the infection is completely cleared up (in order to produce more milk and make more money). So whether the cells in milk technically constitute pus, doesn't it bother you that they are cells that are produced by infection?
Somatic cells vs. White blood cells vs. Pus cells is NOT semantics. Pretty much all food has somatic cells. All meat has somatic cells. Plants have somatic cells. Animal and plant products have somatic cells.

And all milk has white blood cells (excluding plant milk, of course). Including human breast milk. It's supposed to be there, and is good for the baby.

To equate them is misleading at best.

Now, if you want to argue that there's some other stuff in most store-bought milk, fine. Or if there's too much white blood cells, or something. But it REALLY irritates me when people deliberately mislead other people with scare tactics. And then other people, not knowing any better, spread the disinformation.
 
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