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Massive Moose Die Off In US

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
All across the US, moose are dying – and scientists yet don’t know how to save them.

Moose die-off is massive, and a mystery to scientists (+video) - CSMonitor.com
I would like to know what is going on with our Moose population and wish they could pinpoint the problem. I would hate to see our Moose disappear but considering how much their population is in decline that could happen.

Wouldn't be surprised if ticks aren't part of the problem, they are much worse than they use to be because of warmer temperatures. I got a good look at a deer not long ago and that poor thing was so loaded with ticks it was unreal, I'm sure the Moose are having the same problem. I doubt that is the only reason they are disappearing.
 
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Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
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That's a shame. I'm sure we'll see a lot more unfortunate consequences of climate change emerge over the next ten years. Most of the pine trees in the Rockies are dying because of the pine bark beetle infestation. The winters are no longer cold enough to kill them off before they can kill the trees.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
We are having problems with the emerald ash bore. We can't sell fire wood outside the county but for some reason logs are okay.

Last summer we saw deer loaded down with ticks bad. It may start killing them if it hasn't already.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
That's a shame. I'm sure we'll see a lot more unfortunate consequences of climate change emerge over the next ten years. Most of the pine trees in the Rockies are dying because of the pine bark beetle infestation. The winters are no longer cold enough to kill them off before they can kill the trees.
The people in the forest service that I talk to don't say anything about climate change. What they do cite is that many environmentalist groups fight to stop us from cutting down any more trees. Somehow some people actually do believe this though. They want NO trees to be cut down and they think that's healthy for the forest.

Unfortunately, it's healthy for a forest to be thinned out and some people won't see this. If you overcrowd a forest then it's easier for fire to spread, the trees are dry because there's less water to go around, and it's easier for pine beetles to spread because the trees are closer together and thus it's easier to jump the gap and spread.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
Yes, I know. Some people think it's best to just let nature run its course and not cut down the trees.

Fire is also healthy for forests, but in most cases we have to try to prevent it. In some places, like Yellowstone, they actually do controlled burns to thin out the forests, which probably helps promote regeneration.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
They do controlled burns here to keep the fire danger down when its dry. It also helps control ticks. Maybe they should do some controlled burns to help control the ticks on these Moose.
 

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
They do controlled burns here to keep the fire danger down when its dry. It also helps control ticks. Maybe they should do some controlled burns to help control the ticks on these Moose.
That could be helpful since ticks need hardwood trees and humidity to survive. They could also try moving the mooses to softwood forests. And make moose hunting illegal.
Tick - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
That could be helpful since ticks need hardwood trees and humidity to survive. They could also try moving the mooses to softwood forests. And make moose hunting illegal.
Tick - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ticks spread all kinds of diseases including Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. I've known people that have gotten Lyme and RMSF. The man that contracted RMSF died.

You would think they wouldn't be allowing Moose hunting if their numbers are so low.
 
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