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Mass Production

HalfEatenSurprise

Registered Member
Have you ever stopped and pondered how amazing the world of mass production is?
Shops filled to the brim with stuff, that was made or processed in some way. Sent from the other side of the world, assembled by boffins and labourers and transported and stocked and replenished and then done all over again... and again... and so on.

I find it amazing to be honest. The amount of teamwork that must go into these creations. The logistical nightmares that have to be overcome to keep everything up to date, to keep everything available. Even in piss-pot villages the local post office or whatever is stocked. Perhaps not like your average Tesco. But it's a shed in comparison, nonetheless it is there with whatever the village people need. And others too most likely.

Considering an entire republic, or just a county, and the numbers soon become mind-boggling. It's quite remarkable. I mean, truly so. The way humans have come to create such complex and enormous systems.

I'm not sure what my point is for this thread. I just think people deserve a good ol' pat on the back, for managing to slam their millions of minds together and make this work. Although I'm not sure. Are there downsides to this system, that outweigh the brilliance of it? Or is it a sample of brilliance regardless?
Do you think a pat on the back is warranted for the marvels of mass production and areas associated with it? -- Perhaps you don't.
Or perhaps you just don't care. But you should. Shouldn't you?
 

Smelnick

Creeping On You
V.I.P.
It definitely creates jobs. Mindless, soulsucking, boring ass jobs lol. Mass production is only as strong as the employees. If you have one person being slow, it slows everyone down that follows them in the process.

Working in the production industry myself, i know the complexity of it. I make a part of a bus. I work at one of quite a few factories that all make bus parts. We send all those parts to the place where they assemble part of it. Other factories sends parts to the factory that the part bus gets sent to and it gets finished. Within the shop its a process too. One or two people cut the matting and roving. Another team of people spray the resin on the molds and roll the matting and roving. Then me and my partner, trace, drill holes in and cut the parts. We also wrap them up and seperate them into the different orders. If we don't get it done on time, then the shipment is late, and the other shops down the line get delayed.

Like I said, one small thing can cascade a delay down the line. That's how complex it is.
 

fractal

Eye see what you did ther
I don't find it amazing because mass production isn't something that came into being all of a sudden. It started with a very simple form a production, efficient techniques were developed, and slowly it expanded to a large scale. It maybe very complex, but that complexity didn't spring forth from one mind at one time.
 

MAgnum9987

Do What Thou Wilt
I don't find it amazing because mass production isn't something that came into being all of a sudden. It started with a very simple form a production, efficient techniques were developed, and slowly it expanded to a large scale. It maybe very complex, but that complexity didn't spring forth from one mind at one time.
Not really.....

Henry Ford was the first to mass produce. Right off the bat, he took Machinery, lots of craftsmen, created the Assembly Line, and built a quality vehicle and marketed the crap out of it. All of the elements were around before, one man took them all together and made it work. It was hardly slow.
 

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
I've been in many factories: spark plug, automotive, restaurant equipment, plumbing components, cement etc. etc. I find it all quite interesting. Even more interesting is mass customization.
 

shelgarr

Registered Member
Yes, I do think about this a lot. It strikes me how many things I know nothing about. I'm amazed how many different occupations or hobbies people can do or be involved in. Things like simple novelties or imports and the manufacturing of products, food, packaging etc. Have you seen the show "How is it Made?"? Its a great way to get a glimpse of all that is possible. When I look around at things like laboratories, refineries, nuclear plants, freeway interchanges, manufacturing plants, shipping docks, I think about the engineers and workers and the multitude of jobs and specialties. It truly is amazing!!!
 

fractal

Eye see what you did ther
Not really.....

Henry Ford was the first to mass produce. Right off the bat, he took Machinery, lots of craftsmen, created the Assembly Line, and built a quality vehicle and marketed the crap out of it. All of the elements were around before, one man took them all together and made it work. It was hardly slow.
He was a genius for conceiving the idea, but that's not comparable to what it has evolved into today. I would have been impressed at his brilliance at that time, but not at the complexity in the same period.
 

MAgnum9987

Do What Thou Wilt
Yes, I do think about this a lot. It strikes me how many things I know nothing about. I'm amazed how many different occupations or hobbies people can do or be involved in. Things like simple novelties or imports and the manufacturing of products, food, packaging etc. Have you seen the show "How is it Made?"? Its a great way to get a glimpse of all that is possible. When I look around at things like laboratories, refineries, nuclear plants, freeway interchanges, manufacturing plants, shipping docks, I think about the engineers and workers and the multitude of jobs and specialties. It truly is amazing!!!
That is a great show, one of the few truly interesting shows on TV. Though some would disagree.

The only thing I dislike about Mass Production, is craftsmanship. No machine can get the same perfection a worker has. Maybe more consistency, but certainly not perfection. Let me give you an example: Rolls Royce.

The body work on the Rolls Royce Phantom is the best you can get in the world. They are working with aluminum alloy, which is lighter and weaker than steel, so it is much more difficult to work with. When the bodyworkers weld the roof to the frame, they have to be in perfect conjunction. If they weld at different paces the roof will flex and the bodywork will be destroyed. They cannot be too slow or they will burn holes through both the sheet metal and the frame, if they weld too fast they will not be perfect.

When the bodyworkers have the completed the body and are prepping it for paint, they have to sand the body. As they have their sanders they have to listen for a very minor change in pitch to indicate the section of body is sanded to the perfect amount. If they move the sander too early the paint going on afterwords will be flawed. If they move too late it will still be flawed.

Those bodyworkers at Rolls Royce are the best on Earth, they are extremely skilled, and as of yet, no machine can get the same level of perfection as a man.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
I think about this sort of thing a lot, actually. "How It's Made" is a great show. It's amazing how almost everything comes from different factories. The machines in the factories had to be designed (and most of them are really incredible) and probably built in other factories. Then those machines had to be designed. And so on. Then there's the whole shipping industry, getting the products from the factories and warehouses to the vendors, which is amazing as well.
 
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