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Lou Gehrig's streak or Cal Ripken's

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Both had amazing streaks of playing consecutive games. Ripken played in 2,632 straight games and Gehrig played in 2,130.

So in your opinion which one do you believe is more impressive?

Please explain your answer.
 

SHOELESSJOE3

Registered Member
Both had amazing streaks of playing consecutive games. Ripken played in 2,632 straight games and Gehrig played in 2,130.

So in your opinion which one do you believe is more impressive?

Please explain your answer.
I'll appear to be playing the politician here, not giving a direct answer but it's the best I could do.

Have to respect both for doing it in their own times under far different conditions, I lean Gehrigs way just a bit.

First off, Cal played more innings per game. a couple of times Lou played an inning or two and then left the game...............but wait, don't sell Lou short, more to the story. I checked some old box scores.

This is from the 1938 season, late in the year in August
Not a misprint, in those days teams played as many as 25 to 30 double headers and Lou often played in every one and every inning.

August of 1938 and Lou was 35 years old, the next year 1939 was his last felled by a terminal ailment.

August 1938
August 21---------DH
-------22---------OFF DAY
-------23---------DH
-------24---------DH
-------25---------DH
-------26---------DH
-------27---------DH
Checked every single box score and Lou played every single inning of all those games---------12 games in 7 days, now I know why they call him the Iron Horse. It was late in the season, not that young 35 years old, yet he played every inning.



Earlier in August
August 12------DH
--------13 -----single game
--------14------DH
--------15------OFF
--------16------DH-----8 Innings first game------9 innings second game
--------16 rain out
--------18------DH

In the month of August 1938, 20 games in 16 days and he misses one single inning.

I think Lou had the tougher road, 25 or more duble headers per season his whole career and rain out make up dates, 3 and 4 double headers a week took place in every year he played, all day games under the Sun.

Cal coast to coast travel but that was far more comfortable than travel on noisy trains, not air conditioned.
Credit to both in their time but I think Lou's time was more demanding on the body. Add to that on many off days the Yanks would travel to small towns and play exhibition games.
 
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Doc

Trust me, I'm The Doctor.
V.I.P.
My argument for Ripken is simple. He had around 500 more games and almost never was the DH. Defense is harder on the body than playing offense.
 

Rapier

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
My argument for Ripken is simple. He had around 500 more games and almost never was the DH. Defense is harder on the body than playing offense.

Yeah it's simple fer sure.


Lou was a superstar for 2,130 games. One of the top ten players of all time.

Ripken was a journeyman with less pizazz in his career stats than another journeyman Nolan Ryan.

An apt comparison would be Ripken sneaking into Yankee Stadium for 20 years to watch Lou play.
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
IMO, I think Lou Gehrig's was more impressive. He had to play hurt at least 4 times with broken bones. Training, travel and conditioning were a lot different in the 20s and 30s. Lou also played with a 104 temperature. In a interview with Cal Ripken, he said the closes he came to missing a game was on a day that one of his children was born. Ripken's streak is very impressive since he played shortstop and third base. Shortstop a far more demanding position. But better medical, training, travelling by plane (instead of train), field conditions, conditioning programs made Ripken's era easier to play. Tho I see a very good point listed in other comments. During Ripken's years, players had scheduled and took days off. So it is a credit to Cal's fortitude to play everyday instead of just taking a day off.
 

Doc

Trust me, I'm The Doctor.
V.I.P.
Ripken was a journeyman with less pizazz in his career stats than another journeyman Nolan Ryan.
How can you call Ripken a journeyman when he played for the same team his entire career? He was an all star for 19 years, won MVP twice, had a couple of gold gloves, and was the best hitting SS of the late 80's and early 90's. The man was consistent for over 20 years.

Gehrig was easily the better hitter, though. I didn't think hitting stats mattered towards the accomplishment of that many consecutive games.
 
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Millz

Better Call Saul
Staff member
V.I.P.
Yeah I was going to ask about that journeyman comment...I dont really understand that.

But yeah, I am going to take Ripken in this one. There's a reason he holds the record...because his streak was longer...500 games or so longer. It's not Cal's fault what Lou played through...in this day in age nobody plays that many games in a row.
 

Rapier

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
Yeah I was going to ask about that journeyman comment...I dont really understand that.

But yeah, I am going to take Ripken in this one. There's a reason he holds the record...because his streak was longer...500 games or so longer. It's not Cal's fault what Lou played through...in this day in age nobody plays that many games in a row.
A journeyman or journeywoman is an athlete or professional sports player who is technically competent, but unable to excel.[1]


Lou's streak is the more remarkable because he not only showed up, he showed up and played outstandingly.
 
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