Local terminology/phrases that you thought were global

DinoFlintstone

"There can be only one!"
#1
Are there any local phrases/terms that you hear all the time, and you thought everyone in the English speaking world used them... maybe it's even just unique to your family/friends/gang?

Being Scottish, I have loads, but one that I only just found-out is not global is 'Baltic' as in 'It's absolutely Baltic outside' meaning 'it's freezing cold.'
 

hughes_collector

Registered Member
#2
Well, not exactly, but in one regard...

I moved to the town I'm in now 3 years ago. Same state, but other side. Over here, everyone calls the area I came from "the coast", which just seems weird to me.

As far as I know, NOBODY over there calls it "the coast". I wasn't living by the water. There's a lot of land on that side of the state that isn't anywhere near a coast.

I just can't get used to that terminology.
 

DinoFlintstone

"There can be only one!"
#3
Another one is 'piece/pieces' = Sandwich.
I only learned when years ago, my Auntie asked a wee boy and I 'Do you'z want a piece and jam?' and the boy looked ill and said 'Do you have beans?' and my Aunt looked puzzled 'Beans? I offer you a piece and jam and you ask for beans? Hmm, fair enough.' She made him beans and I got my 'piece and jam.'
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#4
I was talking to Anita the other day and we were for some reason discussing Deer Hunting or something and the term "Rut" came up. Turns out "Rut" has just about the same meaning but a little different over there then it does here.

For her "Them dogs are rutting" means "Those dogs are having sex"
For me "Them dogs are in Rut" means "that dog is ready/wanting to have sex".

lol although it doesnt look like a big difference when written down, trust me it makes for a confusing conversation when the definition is off just that slight bit there.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
#5
I was talking to Anita the other day and we were for some reason discussing Deer Hunting or something and the term "Rut" came up. Turns out "Rut" has just about the same meaning but a little different over there then it does here.

For her "Them dogs are rutting" means "Those dogs are having sex"
For me "Them dogs are in Rut" means "that dog is ready/wanting to have sex".
I always took "rut" to mean mating season.
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#6
I was talking to Anita the other day and we were for some reason discussing Deer Hunting or something and the term "Rut" came up. Turns out "Rut" has just about the same meaning but a little different over there then it does here.

For her "Them dogs are rutting" means "Those dogs are having sex"
For me "Them dogs are in Rut" means "that dog is ready/wanting to have sex".

lol although it doesnt look like a big difference when written down, trust me it makes for a confusing conversation when the definition is off just that slight bit there.
I'm in Texas like Anita and I've always interpreted it your way. During rut is when the deer are like dogs "in heat", it's that time, but they may not necessarily be doing it.

For example, during "rut" you may be in a blind and see a doe eating, you know there may be a buck around becuase they're in rut, not that they are actually doing it.
 

hughes_collector

Registered Member
#7
For her "Them dogs are rutting" means "Those dogs are having sex"
For me "Them dogs are in Rut" means "that dog is ready/wanting to have sex".


Where I'm from, "Them dogs are in a Rut" would mean something like, "Them dogs are depressed", or "Them dogs are down-and-out".

:D
 

icegoat63

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
#8
Yeah I always interpreted "Rut" as when the Bucks stink. My dad is a California Hunting Guide and trust me I get to hear him bitch and complain about the Bucks in Rut all the time because they stink the best then and his Dogs just love it.

lol maybe it was just a communication error 'tween Anita and I then. lol It was a random ass conversation to begin with, I dont even know how we got to talking about "rutting" :hah:

Hmmm Another funny term we use here that I'm not sure is widespread would be "ditch bank okie". My family is pretty much comprised of "DBO's".....

Ditch Bank Okies are usually the rednecks of the area that care not to gel with society. Instead you'll find them wearing Camo Bird Vests to nice outings and drinking Panther Piss in the form of Pabst Blue Ribbon & Natural Light.
 

DinoFlintstone

"There can be only one!"
#9
rut noun (HOLE)
/rʌt/
[C] a deep narrow mark made in soft ground especially by a wheel
rut noun (SEXUALLY ACTIVE PERIOD)
/rʌt/
the period of the year during which particular male animals, especially deer and sheep, are sexually active
During the rut, stags can be seen fighting for females.
in rut
(of particular male animals) sexually excited

(Definition of rut noun (SEXUALLY ACTIVE PERIOD) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)


rut noun (SEXUALLY ACTIVE PERIOD)
/rʌt/
the period of the year during which particular male animals, especially deer and sheep, are sexually active
During the rut, stags can be seen fighting for females.
in rut
(of particular male animals) sexually excited

(Definition of rut noun (SEXUALLY ACTIVE PERIOD) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

and my favourite... ... ...
in a rut
If a person, organization, etc. is in a rut, they have become too fixed in one particular type of job, activity, method, etc
I've got to change jobs - after 15 years here I feel I'm (stuck) in a rut (= I'm bored).

(Definition of in a rut from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)
 
#10
Stuck in a rut is a common phrase here.


I realised when I moved that my language is subtly different to most people's up north, even though it's the same country. I was doing some boring book work the other day and I said "ugh this is so dry" and my friend was like.. "why would it be wet?" :eyebrow:
I thought she was joking at first but no. Made me laugh.
I don't use any kind of 'slang' really despite being from kinda near London. I guess you do still pick up on the odd phrase though, like what I just mentioned, thinking it's a globally used word in that context. I can't think of anything else that I say, it's mostly other people's phrases sounding weird to me, and not t'other way round.

ETA: oh and, I thought 'ta' was global but apparently it's not. I use that all the time but I heard recently that you guys (USA) don't. Is that true?
 
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