Life Support

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Ds136

Guest
#11
Vince Carter said:
mostly doctors have a lot of patients, and they see a lot of them die
What are you basing this off of? ER Doctors? Peditrisians? OR Doctors? They're many different types of docotors which deal with different patients of a varying degree. If you were to say that a majority of OR Doctors see their patients die, I'd have to strongly disagree. However if you said a majority of ER docotors see their patients die I would be more inclined to agree, however not actually knowing the numbers I wouldn't beable to be 100% sure of that statement.


Also this thread as being incredibly vague so far. I mean so far all I've read is people looking at the basic principle of whether you or a family member should have the say in if the plug is pulled.

Alot of it varies on the situtation, how the patient is dying. Is it a slow painful death like cancer or a disease of some sort? Is it a shrapnel wound to the head? I mean if they are dying of something of cancer which is incurable at present time and the person is suffering. They should beable to make the call if they want the plug pulled. If its a shrapnel wound to the head, and the doctor believe's the person has a chance to make it however they will be in a vegatative state for the most part, then the burden lies on the patient or the family (depending on the current state of the patient). The doctor should only beable to intervene in such a situation when the patient is in a situation where the odds are in his/her behavior of recovery to a near 100%.

Another thing we need to take in account is the age of the patient. If the person is a 93 year old, it should totally be up to that patient whether they want to end it even if they can make a recovery they might not want to because of all the work invovled and odds are they will die in the next 5 years or so anyway. So maybe they perfer to just end it now while they've had a good life and not have to go through the suffering of rehablitiation and such. Of course I'm refering to a mortal wound of some sort in this situation.

If the patient is an infant, the decision lies on the parents. If they child is having breathing problems and might make it or might not, they should have a choice whether they won't to continue or not. I mean the child could end up surviving but have major issues as child or adult. Perhaps the parents rather not go through that pain or force their child to go through it.

The choice whether someone lives or dies should first and always first rest on the hands of the person who's life it is. If that person is unable to function or communicate in any form, it should then be given to their spouse and children (unless otherwise specified of course), then to family, and then to the doctor.
 

smuda

Registered Member
#12
When my wife was a teenager she sat with both parents and the Doctor of her Grandmother. Her Dad's Mom. The Doctor explained that the age and condition of Grandma was such that he suggested that they remover her feeding tube. My wife's parents were just numbly agreeing with the Doctor and nodding their heads. My wife interupted this and strongly and vocally objected. She fought for her Grandma's right to continue being fed even though she was in a coma! This sort of 'woke up' her parents and they told the Doctor to keep her feeding tube on. Grandma lived another 15 years after she got better. Morally, ethically, spiritually, physically, positively, absolutely, undenyably and reliable alive. :)
 
#13
I think it depends on the situation. If the doctor suggests that the patient remain plugged in, than it's probably the case... after all, the doctor has quite a bit more training than most people and understands the situation much better. If the doctor suggests that the plug be pulled, it's a more difficult matter... does the patient have anything written saying what they would want in this situation? has the patient talked to the family/friends about what they would want? what are the chances of recovery, if any?
 
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eric

Guest
#14
The decision is one that just isn't fair to force a family into. A Living Will exressing your wishes is one of the best things you can do for your family.
 
#15
The decision is one that just isn't fair to force a family into. A Living Will exressing your wishes is one of the best things you can do for your family.
I, and I'm sure many others, agree... but what happens in the event that something happens to someone who does not have a Living Will set up? People might not make one because they feel that they won't need one (not old enough, not at risk enough, etc.), but some tragic accident or something else could force them into a condition where they would need one but be unable to write one.
 
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eric

Guest
#16
SenatorB said:
I, and I'm sure many others, agree... but what happens in the event that something happens to someone who does not have a Living Will set up? People might not make one because they feel that they won't need one (not old enough, not at risk enough, etc.), but some tragic accident or something else could force them into a condition where they would need one but be unable to write one.
That is why we have the debate now. The only thing I can say (Not very profound I'm afraid) is that we have to use a combination of our knowledge of the person, their and our moral and religious beliefs, and depend on good science from doctors and hospitals to give us accurate iinformation.

Almost every doctor's office now asks the question "do you have a living will?" I would hope that will get folks thinking that they should have one.
 
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