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Last Navajo World War II code talker dies

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
ALBUQUERQUE N.M. (Reuters) – The last of 29 Navajo Americans who developed an unbreakable code that helped Allied forces win the second World War died in New Mexico on Wednesday of kidney failure at the age of 93.

Last of Navajo World War II ‘code talkers’ dies in New Mexico
These guys really helped us win the war. The Japanese couldn't break their code because the only place their language was spoken was in the American south west and it wasn't a written language.

They were indeed a bunch of brave men and are credited for saving thousands of American lives. Chester Nez was awarded the Audie Murphy Award for distinguished service. There is also a 2002 movie about their contributions to the cause called Windtalkers.

RIP Chester Nez
 
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dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
I could have sworn there were more than 29 of these guys. Do they mean he was one of 29 that created the code? Not just spoke it?

Using the Navajo code in WWII was completely genius, it's a tactic that I'm afraid wouldn't be useful in a war today though, I think every language (and maybe even dialect) is well documented on the internet these days.
 

Taliesin

Registered Member
I first heard about these guys in an episode of X-Files, and when I looked into their story I was amazed. These guys were true heroes as far as I'm concerned.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I could have sworn there were more than 29 of these guys. Do they mean he was one of 29 that created the code? Not just spoke it?

Using the Navajo code in WWII was completely genius, it's a tactic that I'm afraid wouldn't be useful in a war today though, I think every language (and maybe even dialect) is well documented on the internet these days.
I may be wrong but I doubt the Navajo language is. Its not a written language.

400 Navajo's went on the use the code these original 29 developed.
 

MedicineShow

Registered Member
I've always been intreiged by these guys, and it sucks the last one has died. It would've been interesting to listen to him tell stories.
 
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