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Jackie Robinson

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
I wanted to start a topic about Jackie Robinson, I am sure there's a few members here that have seen him play, or read about him. I think everyone knows that he broke the color barrier in Baseball.

But I want to talk about all sort of things about Robinson, the way he played the game, the things he went through, ect.
 
Having studied Robinson's 1946 season with the Montréal Royals in depth, I'm not sure where to begin... Except that Jackie Robinson almost didn't happen. He had such a rough time getting from L.A. to Daytona Beach for his first training camp that he almost turned around to go back home. He had to be convinced not to pack up and leave. There's no way to guess how that would have impacted the desegregation of the game, but baseball almost lost one of its iconic figures that day in March of 1946.
 

StroShow

The return shall be legenday!
V.I.P.
I'll keep things simple here:

1 - He is a symbol of prevalence beyond hate
2 - He shows us that common belief can be objectively wrong
3 - His legacy is an influence to this day
 

Sabathia

New Member
Nowadays, I don't think you could find two people out a hundred that hate Jackie Robinson. Back then when he played, you'd be hard pressed to find two out a hundred that didn't hate him. What he went through, and what he had to endure to make this game what it is today, is probably the most admirable thing I can think of. !hat an American, baseball, and African American hero.
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
TheMontréalRoyals said:
Having studied Robinson's 1946 season with the Montréal Royals in depth, I'm not sure where to begin... Except that Jackie Robinson almost didn't happen. He had such a rough time getting from L.A. to Daytona Beach for his first training camp that he almost turned around to go back home. He had to be convinced not to pack up and leave. There's no way to guess how that would have impacted the desegregation of the game, but baseball almost lost one of its iconic figures that day in March of 1946.
How did the Montreal fans act towards Jackie? Was it like in Brooklyn at first? Or, he was welcomed from day one from most fans?
 
I had always heard how well Jackie had been treated by Montréal fans. When I started researching the 46 season, I was ready to set the record straight and say that Montrealers hadn't been as nice as we'd like to believe. But I could find no evidence of any form of mistreatment. From the moment he was signed, the media realized the significance of what had just happened. Jackie was cheered louder than any other Royal on opening day, and it never let up until the conclusion of the Junior World Series when Montréal fans carried him around on their shoulders and chased hum around in the streets. One day, Danny Murtaugh, the same Danny Murtaugh who went on to coach the Pirates to two WS who played for Rochester in 1946, spiked Jackie in the first game of a double-header. He was booed loudly every time he was involved in the play for the rest of the afternoon. Robinson really got the rockstar treatment in Montréal, before there were rockstars.

Of course, the Montréal fanbase was never tested. Jackie had an awesome season and the team won it all. What would have happened had he hit ,180 and the team languished in second division? We'll never know. But Robinson himself never had anything but praise for the city. I especially like this one: “As the plane roared skyward and the lights of Montreal twinkled and winked in the distance, I took one last look at this great city where I had found so much happiness. ‘I don’t care if I ever get to the majors, I told myself. This is the city for me. This is paradise’ »
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Thanks for the information. I always figured he was treated well in Montreal, but wasn't absolutely certain.

What's your favourite memory of that '46 season involving Jackie Robinson?
 
That's a tough call. Maybe my favorite moment was in June, Jackie was asked to referee a softball game between the Montréal Canadiens and a team of the YMHA that was played on the fields of Montréal's veterans hospital (the war had been over barely a year at that point). After the game, the players and the refs toured the hospital. At that time, Jackie had leg issues and hadn't played in some times. And troughout his visit, wounded vet after wounded vet, including some who had lost limbs, inquired about the health of his legs and advised him to make sure he was fully healed before going back onto the field so he could help the team. That must have been amazingly moving, especially for Jackie who was himself a veteran (even though he never saw combat). That, along with so many other things that season, I wish I could have seen.
 
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