Israel's PM speech yesterday

Boredie

In need of Entertainment
#1
I applauded what Netanyahu said yesterday at his foreign policy speech to the nations.
He is the first PM to publicly announce that the Israeli government agrees to a Palestinian state.
These are bits of the speech taken from Full text of Netanyahu's foreign policy speech at Bar Ilan - Haaretz - Israel News
The second challenge, rather, the third, so very important challenge, facing us today, is promoting peace. I discussed this also with President Obama. I strongly support the idea of regional peace that he is advancing. I share the President of the U.S.A's desire to bring about a new era of reconciliation in our region.

I discussed this in my meetings with President Mubarak in Egypt and with King Abdullah in Jordan to obtain the assistance of these leaders in the effort to expand the circle of peace in our region.

I appeal tonight to the leaders of the Arab countries and say: Let us meet. Let us talk about peace. Let us make peace. I am willing to meet at any time, at any place, in Damascus, in Riyadh, in Beirut, and in Jerusalem as well. (Applause)
I appeal to you, our Palestinian neighbors, and to the leadership of the Palestinian Authority. Let us begin peace negotiations immediately without prior conditions. Israel is committed to international agreements, and expects all sides to fulfill their obligations.
I say to the Palestinians: We want to live with you in peace, quiet, and good neighborly relations. We want our children and your children to 'know war no more.'
In 1947 when the United Nations proposed the Partition Plan for a Jewish state and an Arab state, the entire Arab world rejected the proposal, while the Jewish community accepted it with great rejoicing and dancing. The Arabs refused any Jewish state whatsoever, with any borders whatsoever.

Whoever thinks that the continued hostility to Israel is a result of our forces in Judea, Samaria and Gaza is confusing cause and effect. The attacks on us began in the 1920s, became an overall attack in 1948 when the state was declared, continued in the 1950s with the fedaayyin attacks, and reached their climax in 1967 on the eve of the Six-Day War, with the attempt to strangle Israel. All this happened nearly 50 years before a single Israeli soldier went into Judea and Samaria.
To our deep regret, this is not happening with the Palestinians. The closer we get to a peace agreement with them, the more they are distancing themselves from peace. They raise new demands. They are not showing us that they want to end the conflict.

A great many people are telling us that withdrawal is the key to peace with the Palestinians. But the fact is that all our withdrawals were met by huge waves of suicide bombers.
I came here tonight to talk about the agreement and security that are broad consensus within Israeli society. This is what guides our policy. This policy must take into account the international situation. We have to recognize international agreements but also principles important to the State of Israel. I spoke tonight about the first principle - recognition. Palestinians must truly recognize Israel as the state of the Jewish people. The second principle is demilitarization. Any area in Palestinian hands has to be demilitarization, with solid security measures. Without this condition, there is a real fear that there will be an armed Palestinian state which will become a terrorist base against Israel, as happened in Gaza. We do not want missiles on Petah Tikva, or Grads on the Ben-Gurion international airport. We want peace. (Applause)
And, to ensure peace we don?t want them to bring in missiles or rockets or have an army, or control of airspace, or make treaties with countries like Iran, or Hizbullah. There is broad agreement on this in Israel. We cannot be expected to agree to a Palestinian state without ensuring that it is demilitarized. This is crucial to the existence of Israel ? we must provide for our security needs.
The territorial issues will be discussed in a permanent agreement. Till then we have no intention to build new settlements or set aside land for new settlements. But there is a need to have people live normal lives and let mothers and fathers raise their children like everyone in the world. The settlers are not enemies of peace. They are our brothers and sisters.
Without this, sooner or later, we will have another Hamastan. We can?t agree to this. Israel must govern its own fate and security. I told President Obama in Washington, if we get a guarantee of demilitarization, and if the Palestinians recognize Israel as the Jewish state, we are ready to agree to a real peace agreement, a demilitarized Palestinian state side by side with the Jewish state. (Applause)

...But above all, they must decide: the Palestinians must decide between path of peace and path of Hamas. They must overcome Hamas. Israel will not sit down at conference table with terrorist who seek to destroy it. (Applause)

Hamas are not willing to even let the Red Cross visit our abducted soldier Gilad Shalit who has been in captivity three years, cut off from his family and his country. We want to bring him back whole and well.
 

Mirage

Administrator
Staff member
V.I.P.
#2
What do you think about a Palestininian state Boredie? It would be interesting to get your opinion on the matter since you actually live in Israel and see more of this struggle first hand.
 

Boredie

In need of Entertainment
#3
I have no problem whatsoever with a state for the Palestinians, as long as they (that includes the Hamas and other Arab leaders) are no longer hostile towards us, and recognize the right for Israel to exist as a Jewish state. There is no point in giving a state to them if months later they destroy Israel. Sure, it would solve everyone's problems if "them bloody Jews" were no longer a factor, eh?
 

Sim

Registered Member
#4
This is indeed very encouraging. It's a great gesture by the Israeli government, they play the ball into the Palestinians' field ... now we have to wait and hope the Palestinians take this ball.

Considering they voted for Hamas in the last election, skepticism is certainly appropriate ... but I wouldn't be too pessimistic either. Even within Hamas, there are people who realize that Palestine would have to gain a lot by a peace with Israel, even if that's just realism and not passionate love for peace. Let's just hope these people get a push by Israel's offer.
 

ysabel

/ˈɪzəˌbɛl/ pink 5
#5
My first thought is "oh wow, I hope no one murders him". It's really encouraging when people of power take steps to make peace or reach a compromise. However, he needs not only the cooperation of the other party (its leaders and people) but the full support of his own people. It's a big task. I also wonder if some are afraid to realise some form of peace because they've always lived in violence and fighting and don't know what else to do when there's nothing more to fight about.
 

Boredie

In need of Entertainment
#6
I also wonder if some are afraid to realise some form of peace because they've always lived in violence and fighting and don't know what else to do when there's nothing more to fight about.
It wouldn't surprise me if that's the case. On what will they focus their hatred once there's peace? Hmm...
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
#7
My first thought is "oh wow, I hope no one murders him". It's really encouraging when people of power take steps to make peace or reach a compromise.
Fortunately, he probably has a lot more security than a lot of the leaders in the past who were assassinated for taking steps for peace. Security measures have come a long way since Lincoln (or even Kennedy), and I'm not sure, but I don't think MLK or Ghandi had much in the way of security even by the standards of when they lived, because they weren't elected officials. In fact, they might have had (almost) none.
 
Last edited:
#8
..well, that, and they were all killed by their own extremists. Ghandi, Sadat, Rabin, ..Lincoln.

"In 1947 when the United Nations proposed the Partition Plan for a Jewish state and an Arab state, the entire Arab world rejected the proposal, while the Jewish community accepted it with great rejoicing and dancing. The Arabs refused any Jewish state whatsoever, with any borders whatsoever."

harhar.. I guess he has to say these things. But yes, encouraging.. on the surface. I know how it will be received initially in Egypt or Syria, though. And that they need to have someone reaching out (in a measured way, accepting they need to discuss foundations for the conflict) on the other side now, and an open (and reasonably non- insulting) response from the Israeli leadership afterwards.

Otherwise it will be seen as a prelude to another pr operation, to cover for a military attack in the name of peace.

I wonder if with the dynamic now, with more players and a less centralized power- structure in Palestine, that there really is an opportunity for Netanyahu to be seen as in control now, without the various arab players being seen as sidelined by their own. So we're lacking at this point a brave statement from Arabic leader- igures searching into Netanyahu's framework - focusing on a peaceful state of affairs for the next generation - rather than for example the usual "peace with honor" euphemisms..
 

Boredie

In need of Entertainment
#9
"In 1947 when the United Nations proposed the Partition Plan for a Jewish state and an Arab state, the entire Arab world rejected the proposal, while the Jewish community accepted it with great rejoicing and dancing. The Arabs refused any Jewish state whatsoever, with any borders whatsoever."

harhar.. I guess he has to say these things.
Obviously you don't know the history of the region very well. No wonder you're so prejudice.
From wiki:
In the aftermath of the adoption of the United Nations' partition plan, the manifestations of joy of the Jewish community were counterbalanced by protests by Arabs throughout the country[17] and after the 1 December, the Arab Higher Committee enacted a general strike that lasted three days.[18]
A 'wind of violence'[19] rapidly took hold of the country, foreboding civil war between the two communities.[20]

[17] Extracts from Time Magazine of that time [1]
[18]^ Yoav Gelber (2006), p.17
[19]^ This expression is taken from Ilan Pappé (2000), p.111
[20]^ Benny Morris (2003), p.65
 
Last edited: