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Isn't this redundant?

JAdams

Registered Member
I noticed a trend in my stories: Most of them have either a blind character my protagonist knows or the protagonist him/herself is blind.

I'm not sure if this is because I'm half-blind and once went to a school for the deaf and blind (deaf myself), but I noticed this and wondered if it was redundant? Maybe I should change some things.

Thoughts?
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
People often write from perspectives they're familiar with. Don't be ashamed or worried about it as it could be something you're quite good at due to experience. However, trying new perspectives is also essential to becoming a better writer.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
It's quite common for there to be recurring themes in author's work. Some are more obvious than others, but rarely is there something wrong with it.

In your case, it's only a physical trait. Unless you make it integral to the plot the same way over and over, I don't see a problem with it.

Sometimes, even with authors I really like, they get a bit too predictable. I've found myself thinking "Okay, this character is probably going to be the one who dies." I still enjoy the book, but it takes a little bit away from the experience.
 

JAdams

Registered Member
By integral to the plot, you mean having books where the role of the blind person is the same?

But having books where one blind character is the main detective, another is a fantasy creature that flies and fights with a sword, and another where this blind person is just a companion to the sighted protagonist, that isn't redundant?
 
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Chaos

Epic Gamer
V.I.P.
Redundant? Probably not. At first it seems like a Marty Stu/self-insertion but I'd agree with Merc, it's a viewpoint that not many can relate to (and therefore write successfully); because you have a familiarity with it, by all means take advantage of that. However, basing all your works from the same viewpoint can hold you back as a writer.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
By integral to the plot, you mean having books where the role of the blind person is the same?

But having books where one blind character is the main detective, another is a fantasy creature that flies and fights with a sword, and another where this blind person is just a companion to the sighted protagonist, that isn't redundant?
That could be somewhat redundant, but not necessarily.

I mean like if the character who's blind always manages to save the day because he's blind (like his slightly heightened other senses let him notice danger, or the antagonist tries to blind him and it doesn't work, etc).

Being able to predict a character's trait probably doesn't matter too much. But being able to predict how that one trait will affect the storyline is probably too predictable.
 
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