Is Canada really a hockey powerhouse?

Discussion in 'Hockey' started by Babe_Ruth, Mar 15, 2008.

  1. Babe_Ruth

    Babe_Ruth Sultan of Swat Staff Member V.I.P.

    Many argue that Canadians are the powerhouse of hockey. Many argue that Finland is, or Russia, or even Slovakia! But one thing is for sure, Canadian teams have been slipping every year and have not been able to "bring it" when it counts. The last several years, Canadian teams have had the chanve to bring the Cup home, but have not been able to do it! Why? Maybe they don't really want it bad enough, eehh!

    I took this article from another forum, and I know most of the hockey fans here are American, so I was wondering what you guys thought about this?
     

  2. Major

    Major 4 legs good 2 legs bad V.I.P.

    You're talking about Canadian teams in the NHL? That really has nothing to do with the country being a hockey powerhouse since NHL teams have players from all over the world. There's no guarantee that a Canadian team will have more Canadian players than an American team.

    To answer your question, all you have to do is look at the number of Canadian players in the NHL compared to other countries. The league is over 50% Canadians. The second highest number is the United States at 18%, and then it drops off significantly to the third highest.
     
  3. padd

    padd Registered Member

    On the World stage Canada has won 4 straight World Junior titles, 3 of the past 5 world championships. They HAD the potential of winning the gold in 2006 olympics but Gretzky fucked up when he made his roster.. but i wont' go into those details.
    Are we still a powehouse? of course, all the best players are Canadian.. Iginla, Crosby, Lecavalier, Thornton, Savard..
    2008 may not be the best year to stand out with Ovechkin and Malkin getting all the attention this year.. so what, since the lockout Canadians have excelled more than any other. And if Crosby wasnt injured he'd win the Art Ross this year.
    Although Canada is still a powerhouse, they aren't as dominant.. I'm sure they are neck to neck with Sweden right now, on the world ranking, seeing Sweden winning the last olympics gives you alota points. And dont forget, Sweden ended Canadas 15+ game winning streak on international ice last december.
    Both Canada and Sweden will have expcetional futures.

    btw u cant base this on NHL teams, you should know more than anybody here.. I mean the Habs have what; 4 Canadian players? and Brisbois and Dandenault are scratched every second game LOL.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2008
  4. Marchy

    Marchy Registered Member

    but atleast the canadian teams are making it to the finals, the sens came up flat last years because they quit playing with toughness to a dirtier ducks team. this year i like montreal because of the youth and energy they play with, if the sens find some goaltending they could also make a nice late push into the playoffs.

    the playoffs come down to whose got the hotter goaltender and special teams.
     
  5. padd

    padd Registered Member

    What scares me is Montreal's TERRIBLE record vs the Western Confrence.
    if they make the finals and they play, example; the Sharks they're gonna have to start going for the boards.
     
  6. juha82

    juha82 Registered Member

    Canadian hockey player are usually about such players who puts a lot of energy/intensity on the ice.
    There is some convinging Euros too but overall North-American players are better.
    Particularly Canadian hockey players.
     
  7. icegoat63

    icegoat63 Son of Liberty V.I.P. Lifetime

    I dont think its necessarily fair to call any one nation the powerhouse of hockey. We all play to our strengths and as far as Im concerned the only REAL powerhouse in hockey history was Communist Russia. If Canada straight up dominated the world cup of hockey every year then yes I would call them the powerhouse. But instead we do have the parody where they are not the "Sure win" every race.

    I consider Communist Russia a powerhouse, because look at what they did.... They dominated decades worth of Gold performance with little or no competition. 'Till the 1980 US team ;)
    ------
    But also I do recognize that Communist Russia was only so good because their players never were allowed to go Pro. So obviously sticking weathered 25-30 year olds vs. college boys is not much of competition.

    Also the reason Cuba dominates Boxing.... they dont have a pro division so they can stick these weathered 30 year olds out against college age non-pro fighters from North America
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2008
  8. padd

    padd Registered Member

    The soviet's weren't the best, sure they won alot of Gold Medals @ the Olypics, but like you said the Olympics were not @ the highest level when it came to hockey
    Canada won 6 of the 7 World/Canada Cups of hockey and appeared in every final

    The only great players in the league nowadays who are not Canadian are Malkin and Ovechkin
     
  9. icegoat63

    icegoat63 Son of Liberty V.I.P. Lifetime

    actually.... Canada has won 19 times to Russias 23. I was trying to stay away from World Juniors and keep it more Olympic. Because in my interpretation when you talk about National Powerhouses thats the clearest cut way IMO. It was my mistake to use "world cup of hockey" I forgot about the iihl thing they do. I did mean the Olympics...my fault.
     
  10. padd

    padd Registered Member

    you're outdated there, Russia has 23 but Canada has 24.. if you're talking about the IIHF championships.. Russia/USSR haven't won since 1993.
    If you're talking about Olympics then Russia outnumbers Canada 8-7 in Gold medals.

    But the Olympics, have only in recent years pictured the world's elite. Back in the 1970's and 80's it didn't showcase international hockey at it's highest level. The Russians spanked the world all the time at these international events because Canada never had Esposito, Gretzky or Lemieux.. or any great player on their team, because they were obviously eithr in the NHL or not eligible for Olympic play.
     

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