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Is an IQ score a useful indication of real world Intelligence

CtB95

New Member
I just took an IQ test called the Gigi sprint, and I got a 120. I am 15 and I do not know how to feel about this score. I have several questions relating to this topic that I want this forum's opinions on.
1. Is it worth getting a "legitimate" IQ test such as the Stanford-Binet?
2. Is your IQ an actual representation of how smart someone is, in your opinion?
3. If an IQ test is useful in determining one's intelligence and ability to learn, then why don't colleges and universities use them in the admissions process.

Thank you
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
Depends on what you mean by "intelligence".

There are street smarts, book smarts, reasoning skills, etc. Measuring someone's intelligence incorporates a lot of variables that we simply aren't capable of measuring so far.
 

CtB95

New Member
Yes, I agree that I was not being quite clear, and that there are several meanings one could assign to intelligence. To clarify, what kinds of intelligence do you think an IQ test can accurately assess, and do you think that IQ tests should be used in college admission processes?
 

PretzelCorps

Registered Member
The intelligence IQ tests test for is whatever intelligence the particular IQ test is testing for. I don't think there's even a standard. Usually that would be math and verbal reasoning; real "left brained" kinda stuff. Some IQ tests test you for your ability to learn and pick up on things. Others still test mechanical aptitude. As for college admissions, I don't see why aptitude tests that test for qualities a college is looking for particularly shouldn't be utilized.

Personally, though, if you really are smart, you probably shouldn't have to look to IQ tests for affirmation....
 
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fractal

Eye see what you did ther
Yes, I agree that I was not being quite clear, and that there are several meanings one could assign to intelligence. To clarify, what kinds of intelligence do you think an IQ test can accurately assess, and do you think that IQ tests should be used in college admission processes?
Well, here's a thread discussing the Gigi Sprint test: http://www.generalforum.com/philoso...-minute-iq-test-tell-me-what-think-73931.html

Indirect IQ tests are already being used in admission processes. For example, GRE is a measure of verbal intelligence. The mathematical skill it measures is laughable. For many companies in India, you are required to write an aptitude test that consists of questions that are normally found in IQ tests. Admission tests finally use the most acceptable test even though the test may not even begin to measure the skill genuinely required for that particular field.

An IQ test is similar to that. You don't have a better way of measuring intelligence yet, so we have to do with IQ tests even though it has several limitations.
 

CtB95

New Member
Personally, though, if you really are smart, you probably shouldn't have to look to IQ tests for affirmation....
In a way, that makes sense. But I really don't know if I'm smart. However, just assuring myself that I'm smart is conceited, and I see nothing wrong with attempting to find an objective measure of intelligence. That's why I went searching for a IQ test, and the Gigi one looked fairly reputable at short glance.

Indirect IQ tests are already being used in admission processes. For example, GRE is a measure of verbal intelligence. The mathematical skill it measures is laughable. For many companies in India, you are required to write an aptitude test that consists of questions that are normally found in IQ tests. Admission tests finally use the most acceptable test even though the test may not even begin to measure the skill genuinely required for that particular field.

An IQ test is similar to that. You don't have a better way of measuring intelligence yet, so we have to do with IQ tests even though it has several limitations.
Thanks for the link. So, if I'm understanding your stance correctly, you think that IQ tests are helpful, but you're of the opinion that some tests are less than perfect at measuring certain skills or intelligence as a whole. So what test do you think is the best, and have you taken it?
 

fractal

Eye see what you did ther
I can understand why you found Gigi professional. That's because it was calibrated by a genuine IQ society and it was not some random test made for fun.

The best test I've taken is called The Advanced IQ Test.
Welcome to Facebook

Unlike the Gigi, it measures different types of intelligence and I found it quite difficult.

I don't believe in the absolute value of an IQ test. I'm one of the smartest people at my college, but at the same time there are several people who have IQs much higher than mine. I believe the reason for this is that my thought process is much more refined than theirs, but an IQ test does not require much of a thought process. You either get it, or you don't. I might be able to process complex ideas and evaluate them; but just because I can't figure out the next number, do arithmetic in my head, or spin objects in my mind it doesn't mean I'm not intelligent. Nor is the converse. And an IQ test doesn't measure the most powerful aspect of the human mind - creativity.
 
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Ivan

Registered Member
I think it's not.
In my opinion, IQ tests have many limitations. Even in those areas which IQ tests covers results are not so exact.
For example, my friend is working in 3d graphics industry so he solve graphic problems in IQ tests really really quicky, but that is because his eyes are trained for graphic things and that is not a new situation for him like it is for most of people.
Because of that and similar things I really don't think that IQ tests are real measure even in that areas which are covered by them.


Also, creativity, social and emotional intelligence are the most important for any success in real life. And that simply can't be measured.

In the end, I don't really see a point of measuring "intelligence", because even if it can be really measured it is just a potential, which just might be fulfilled.
 
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