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If Noah's Ark were to be discovered...

maledoro

Strange Visitor
Um, boats don't float on clouds.... We are talking about standing water here.
At the time I had posted, I thought that you were revisiting that vapor dome nonsense. Apologies.

Now, have we for sure found an ark on Mount Ararat?
 

Mirage

Secret Agent
Staff member
V.I.P.
Of course not. There are only theories at the moment. As I said earlier though, there is a good chance that an expedition will eventually climb the mountain and check out the various "obscurities" that have been found via satellites. IF the ark were to be found and it was found to be near the right age and proportions/size, it would change quite a few people's thinking on the matter.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
I'd definitely be surprised if they found Noah's Ark, but I'm not sure that it would change my mind about anything. I already believe that some of the stories in the Bible are true. This discovery wouldn't prove the legitimacy of the entire Bible.
 

maledoro

Strange Visitor
I'd definitely be surprised if they found Noah's Ark, but I'm not sure that it would change my mind about anything. I already believe that some of the stories in the Bible are true. This discovery wouldn't prove the legitimacy of the entire Bible.
Of course some of the stories in the bible are true. A lot of them were appropriated from other mythologies and legends, too.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
On top of Mount Ararat satellite images have shown a huge ark shaped thing, that is the size of what the ark is claimed to be. Also there have been fish fossils discovered all over the world on mountains.
 

Doc

Trust me, I'm The Doctor.
V.I.P.
It would surely be interesting to find the Ark, but it really doesn't change my impression. I believe that the Flood is real, so I wouldn't be shocked to see that someone built a huge ark to live through it.

I don't think we'll find evidence of two of every animal, or things like that, but it'd still be a major discovery.
 

Hi_Im_Tim

I am Heavy Weapons Guy
There are about 250 flood accounts from different cultures. Guess what happens in almost every one of them. One person builds a boat and saves his family and some animals. They are mostly the same story. If there wasn't a flood, then how is it that 250 different cultures came up with the same story?

I don't think we'll find evidence of two of every animal
Then how would animals be living today? They can't swim for that long.
 

soot

Registered Member
The Jewish flood mythology is based on much older flood mythology that had been handed down through the Sumerians and Babylonians for generations (see The Epic of Gilgamesh, specifically Tablet XI and the story of Utanapishtim) which they had probably taken from from the oral historical myth traditions of still older peoples.

The Jews simply co-opted the myth and assigned its origins to their God rather than the gods it had been traditionally told around for several thousand years.

So even if the Ark is found it doesn't indicate that there is any truth to the Noah story and it doesn't grant any credibility to the Judeo-Christian religious traditions, it only proves that there was some truth to the much older stories that the Jews plagerized.

I don't think that there was a global flood of Biblical proportions in actual fact. I think it's very likely that there were numerous localized floods that account for the diversity of flood mythology from around the world.

We need to bear in mind that these floods occured, and myths originated, in prehistorical times when people were still very, very primitive - probably closer to cavemen than they were to modern man.

At that point in human development, when a flood occured that wiped out several local villages, it truly could have been said to have wiped out the "whole world" because all those people knew of the "whole world" extended probably no more than 100 miles from their homes in any direction (think of how people in the 14th and 15th centuries still thought the world was flat and how they considered what they knew of it to be the "whole world" - Elsewhere there be dragons).

A few local survivors or those living in villages just beyond the reaches of the flood began telling stories of what truly was the most devestating event to have ever occured in their lifetimes. Over time these stories took on supernatural proportions and assumed unrelated signifigances, the way stroies have a tendancy to once men start telling them. The more the story was told the more it was embelished and the more it was fableized.

Several thousand years later the story was only superficially similar to the original accounts and had taken on a life of their own, shrouded in religious signifigance and hung with ethical morals.

Maybe there was an ark that escaped one of these floods for one reason or another. If so, it was probably a boat that had been built for reasons completly unrelated to any personal message from the gods, or a God, to any specific individual. Some guy had simply been preparing a shipment of livestock when a post-glacial ice dam Between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean broke and flooded the surrounding region wiping out a few dozen, or maybe a hundred coastal villages.

But the boat survived and the man survived and the load of goats he was planning on transporting survived.

After the story of this lucky guy and his boat had been passed down for several hundred or a few thousand years it had morphed into a tale of divine intervention and retribution.

Regardless of what they may or may not find on Mt. Ararat I don't think it can possibly be said to stand for any sort of confirmation of any Bibilical story because the Biblical story itself didn't originate with Judaism. So maybe the gods of the ancient Sumerians caused a flood, but the God of Abraham and Isaac only rode the older god's coat tails, at best.

Further, I don't think those older gods really had any kind of hand in actual human affairs either because the stories can just as easily be explained by perfectly ordinary geoliogic events later embelished by human story telling.

Occam's rasor - why attribute to supernatural what can just as easily be explained by the natural.
 
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Steerpike

Registered Member
The Jewish flood mythology is based on much older flood mythology that had been handed down through the Sumerians and Babylonians for generations (see The Epic of Gilgamesh, specifically Tablet XI and the story of Utanapishtim) which they had probably taken from from the oral historical myth traditions of still older peoples.

The Jews simply co-opted the myth and assigned its origins to their God rather than the gods it had been traditionally told around for several thousand years.

So even if the Ark is found it doesn't indicate that there is any truth to the Noah story and it doesn't grant any credibility to the Judeo-Christian religious traditions, it only proves that there was some truth to the much older stories that the Jews plagerized.
There are also similarities between portions of Mosaic Law and the Code of Hammurabi. Allegedly Moses wrote the first five books of the bible in which both of these things (The deluge and laws) are written. So there would be one writer possibly using Babylonian souce materials for both.
 
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oxyMORON

A Darker Knight
Here's the page from Skeptic's Dictionary about Noah's ark.

I think there was indeed a catastrophic flood that occurred a long time ago, but I don't believe that a specific person named Noah built a gigantic boat and saved everything.
 
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