How To Go From Being Poor To Being Rich

Godsmirror

Registered Member
#1
They say that the system is rigged. That if you were born poor, it is extremely hard, if not impossible, to move up in your socioeconomic class.

They also say that the United States is the land of infinate possiblilities. That it is easier here than anywhere else in the world to do just that.

So which theory do you subscribe to? Is it probable or not?

I for one think it is. The trick is, think outside the box. Do what others have done to work their way out of one tax bracket and into the next highest........then the next.....then the next. Look at every single opportunity afforded to us and take what you can work to your favor, combining different methods if you have to, and keep your focus. Take it as seriously as you would a relationship.

What do you think?
 

Impaired

Registered Member
#2
They are both true. The system is rigged but it is a land of opportunities. Being poor = access to less (and worse) education, access to less healthy food, less access to books and culture. That said, hard work and determination can make up for a lot.
 

NellyBell

Registered Member
#3
I agree that hard work and determination can make up for a lot. We definitely live in a society that has an "if you want it bad enough, you can do it" mentality. However, I think the goal might need to be defined than just "get rich". Sometimes, setting our aims too high can only lead to frustration and disappointment that will inevitably stall our plans. I subscribe more to the Rudy way of things. He wanted to play for Notre Dame, something no one believed he could do for a multitude of reasons, and he beat so many odds to not only get into Notre Dame but to actually be allowed to play in one game. Just one game. And that was enough for him. He didn't need to be a star (or even regular) player; he didn't need to play the whole season; he didn't even have to play an entire game - he just needed to be on the field during a game for a minute to feel as though his dreams were fully accomplished. He worked his butt off for years just for that single opportunity. Like his friend says, "having dreams is what makes life tolerable" but we need to realize that our dreams don't always manifest themselves in the ways we imagined.

So in this case, aim to get an education. Aim to get work experience and really work while you're there. Be willing to climb your way up the ladder at a mediocre job in order to open up other opportunities. Constantly be looking for opportunities and ways to better yourself to get those opportunities when you find them. And so on and so forth. But be able to tell yourself that, if you don't find yourself as rich as Bill Gates but still have increased your wealth significantly (as well as many other things about yourself), that you've done "good enough" and you should be proud.
 

Mirage

Administrator
Staff member
V.I.P.
#4
It really depends. There are infinite roads to success and failure. For me, I have never been a true opportunist when it comes to being an entrepreneur. As I've worked for myself, clients, and companies over the years, I've learned that the best work is doing something that you love. Whether it's working for a company so you can afford to do what you love on the side, or whether it's doing what you love for your main job, and subsidizing that income with side stuff that you don't love as much, you have to just ask yourself—how badly do I want to be "rich" and at what cost?

For example, there are a ton of things you can do online to make money. A simple search on Google will bring back thousands of "pay me to teach you what I know and you can get rich too" programs. Not necessarily the "get rich quick" programs, but the truly genuine "work your butt off using the skills I'll teach you and you'll have a good chance of making a good income" programs. Do you want to actually do this stuff though? Maybe you do. Maybe you don't. For me, I'm interested in a lot of things and endeavors, so a lot of the opportunities on the Internet have interested me, over the years, but at the end of the day, I'm not the one to do something just because I could get rich. I want to understand and be passionate about what I do, not just be in it for the money.
 

Godsmirror

Registered Member
#5
I can understand that point of view, but there is also this: If you have to be relegated to doing a job you really don't like, that kind of forces you to "like" money, or at least appear to others that you do, more than you would if you were doing something you were passionate about. Doing the latter affords people the opportunity to say "Money isn't everything". When you're near the bottom of ladder scratching just to hold on, money IS everything.

I for one will never judge anyone who seems hell-bent on making as much money as possiblle because I for one understand why people acquire that mindset. It's not that they "love money". They love the idea that it can bring them a better way of life in the long run.
 

Impaired

Registered Member
#6
I have one wealthy relative, a cousin, who works 70 hours weeks, is never home and while he is doing it all for his family, his family wishes he was home. The kids live in a mansion, get brand new cars when they turn 16 and have anything money can buy. They want their dad home more. My cousin busts his ass working and is very good at what he does.

There are all kinds of riches. Me, I am happy working just hard enough to make enough money so I can enjoy life when I am not working. I like being home with the family.
 

Mirage

Administrator
Staff member
V.I.P.
#7
Well said, @Impaired. Time is the most valuable commodity. You can use your time to get more money, or you can use your money to get more time. You can always make more money, but you can never get more time overall. So when I say you can use money to get more time, I mean the with money you can hire others to use their time to make you money, or you could invest with it and not have to use as much of your own time to earn money, etc. not everyone can do this but on some level, we all can if we make good money decisions and purchases (or opting to not purchase something).
 

Carmelita

Registered Member
#8
It really depends. There are infinite roads to success and failure. For me, I have never been a true opportunist when it comes to being an entrepreneur. As I've worked for myself, clients, and companies over the years, I've learned that the best work is doing something that you love. Whether it's working for a company so you can afford to do what you love on the side, or whether it's doing what you love for your main job, and subsidizing that income with side stuff that you don't love as much, you have to just ask yourself—how badly do I want to be "rich" and at what cost?

For example, there are a ton of things you can do online to make money. A simple search on Google will bring back thousands of "pay me to teach you what I know and you can get rich too" programs. Not necessarily the "get rich quick" programs, but the truly genuine "work your butt off using the skills I'll teach you and you'll have a good chance of making a good income" programs. Do you want to actually do this stuff though? Maybe you do. Maybe you don't. For me, I'm interested in a lot of things and endeavors, so a lot of the opportunities on the Internet have interested me, over the years, but at the end of the day, I'm not the one to do something just because I could get rich. I want to understand and be passionate about what I do, not just be in it for the money.
I totally agree with you that whatever your choice of vocation, you must love it to become successful. You have to love to get emersed in it every day, roam around in it, adjust it, research it, and well, you get the idea. If you can find something that you love that much, you can spend the time and make the effort that is required (don't let anyone tell you it is easy, 'cause it ain't) and create something that benefits other people, well, then you have something that will make money.
 

Godsmirror

Registered Member
#9
So when I say you can use money to get more time, I mean the with money you can hire others to use their time to make you money
That inventive way of doling out your work is becoming more popular. Work 40 hours, pay the person less (yet a liveable wage) than what you made for the 30 hours you're giving up for the sake of being with family. You may not make nearly as much, but you're not giving away those 30 hours either.

If you make enough to give your kids sports cars when they turn 16, you can afford to take a pay cut for 30 hours out of 70.
 
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