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How the FCC takes control of the internet

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
So this is how unelected bureaucrats implement the will of the executive and ignore both congress and the courts to take control and exert their power:

John Fund: The Net Neutrality Coup - WSJ.com

Yep, fundamental change for America, just as he promised. His heroes Saul and Karl would be proud.

This method will be used in many ways, next: the EPA and carbon regulation.
 

ExpectantlyIronic

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Hey, whatever it takes to counter the lobbyists, ad campaigns, and media influence the cable companies use to get their way. These guys will spare no expense to ensure they don't lose a drop of power over what consumers have access to, and to be clear, that is exactly what these guys are fighting for. The FCC isn't trying to regulate the internet. Not at all. That's a damn lie. They are trying to prevent the cable companies from regulating the internet.
 

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
Nope, they're establishing a regulatory foothold by "solving" a problem that does not yet exist. Once their authority is established then they can expand their area of control. Just wait and see.
 

C-Mach

Registered Member
My representative, Henry Waxman, tried to impose the Fairness Doctrine on the Internet earlier this year. The new FCC regulations would allow for such a Fairness Doctrine to be applied to the Internet. Remember: The slippery slope fallacy is ceases to be a fallacy when applied to government, as history has shown it to be fact in multiple instances.

P.S. Why should the cable companies not be permitted to charge rates on certain websites? If the customers don't like it, they can always move to a different Internet service provider that won't. If there isn't another ISP that will do that, we have sufficient anti-trust laws to take care of that.
 

ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
CMach said:
My representative, Henry Waxman, tried to impose the Fairness Doctrine on the Internet earlier this year. The new FCC regulations would allow for such a Fairness Doctrine to be applied to the Internet. Remember: The slippery slope fallacy is ceases to be a fallacy when applied to government, as history has shown it to be fact in multiple instances.

P.S. Why should the cable companies not be permitted to charge rates on certain websites? If the customers don't like it, they can always move to a different Internet service provider that won't. If there isn't another ISP that will do that, we have sufficient anti-trust laws to take care of that.
Henry Waxmen never tried to impose the Fairness Doctrine on the internet, merely made some vague comments that demonstrated a major lack of understanding of the internet on his part. If the FCC were to try and police content on the internet, I would be the first to oppose it. As it is, that is not what's on the table. As for ISPs: people often only have a single cable internet provider in their locality, and there are only so many out there. It's why many have found themselves free to impose bandwidth restrictions and the like.
 
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